UQ Pharmacy School embraces diversity

A team of Pharmacy academics from the University of Queensland (UQ) have recently received a Vice-Chancellor’s Equity and Diversity Award, which recognizes UQ staff and students who have made a significant contribution to equity and diversity.

Find out more about UQ Pharmacy School
Study at the University of Queensland School of Pharmacy

The team from Skills for Communicating and Relating in Pharmacy Training program (SCRIPT) was presented with the award, worth $5000 at a ceremony at the University on Thursday, May 23, 2013.

Historically, between 36 and 53 percent of pharmacy students don’t speak English at home, a language assessed in all years of the undergraduate pharmacy program at UQ. In order to be effective communicators in their field, students and graduates need to have a high quality of discipline-specific and colloquial English to be successful.


SCRIPT recognizes the challenges that these students face and developed the program, which teaches effective English communication skills.

SCRIPT is the result of multidisciplinary collaboration between pharmacy academics from the UQ School of Pharmacy, specialist language teachers from the Institute of Continuing and TESOL Education (ICTE-UQ), and higher education experts from the UQ Teaching and Educational Development Institute (TEDI).

Project team leader Jacqueline Bond from the UQ School of Pharmacy said the program aimed to identify and address the language barrier issues for non-native English speakers, such as Australian colloquialisms, early on in their studies.

It’s vital that graduates have excellent communication skills when they enter the pharmacy profession, to ensure that medicines are used safely and effectively.

Ms Bond said the program was established in 2008 to better prepare undergraduates for their experiential placements in pharmacies, and oral communication assessments, which begin in their first year of study.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

University of Sydney is closing the veterinary void

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

Studying at UQ Pharmacy is more than just counting pills