Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Monash chemical engineer helps effectiveness of asthma inhalers

Do you suffer from asthma?

Asthma inhalers could soon become more effective thanks to a clever new way of manufacturing the particles they deliver, developed by a Monash chemical engineer.

Current puffer designs and typical size range of particles mean a large portion of the medication propelled into a patient’s throat remains there. Only a fraction reaches the lungs.

Monash University Engineering School
Study Engineering at Monash University
But Monash University lecturer Dr Meng Wai Woo, Department of Chemical Engineering, and his team have now developed a method of producing ultra-fine particles, which will make drug delivery more consistent and efficient.

The new method, known as anti-solvent vapour precipitation, uses ethanol to dehydrate droplets, and results in super-small particles of uniform size.

“Ultra-fine uniform particles will ensure that fewer drug particles get stuck in the throat while more can reach the lower regions of the lungs,” Dr Woo said. “Because we can now make the small particles more uniform, it means the inhalers will work better.”

The team’s work results in particles smaller than a micron (thousandth of a millimetre) in diameter – much smaller than those produced by conventional dehydrating mechanisms, which are limited by the size of the atomized droplet.

The team’s discovery was unveiled at the 18th International Drying Symposium in Xiamen, China, last year. It is likely to create interest among pharmaceutical companies. Infusion devices and metered dose inhalers account for around $US20 billion in worldwide sales each year, with the key development aim being to balance improved efficiency against the cost of manufacture.

Dr Woo’s method means that the pharmaceutical industry can now potentially deliver critical medicines via the airway direct into the lungs with much greater accuracy.

“From a drug manufacturer’s perspective, this new approach can maintain the uniformity of the particle and yet potentially maintain commercially viable production rate,” said the Monash University lecturer.

Investigations into using ethanol as a means of producing ultra-fine particles began in 2011, as part of Dr Woo’s ongoing research into manufacturing processes in the dairy industry.

Attempting to produce lactose crystals, his team decided to reject the traditional hot air drying method and use nitrogen laced with ethanol vapour as an alternative dehydrating agent.

To their surprise, the result was not the crystals they expected, but hundreds of very tiny, very uniform lactose particles. Further testing showed that the amount of alcohol absorbed into the initial droplets was a key variable in influencing the outcome.

Assisted by a grant from the Australian Research Council, the Monash team is now testing its method on another dairy product, whey, and researching the ultra-fine particle delivery of protein-based medicines. They are also building a demonstration unit to showcase the anti-solvent vapour precipitation process, which will be completed later this year.

Dr Woo is one of 12 early-career scientists presenting their research to the public this week during Fresh Science, a national program sponsored by the Australian Government.




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