Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Animals in Need fund at the Sydney Veterinary School

The Animals in Need fund at the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science is helping cover the cost of much-needed veterinary care for pets from disadvantaged families, or stray and neglected animals and wildlife.

University of Sydney Veterinary School
Study veterinary medicine at Sydney Uni
Patsy, an Australian kelpie, has been a wonderful companion to Ms Alja Brown, who adopted her at three months. But life hasn’t always been easy for Patsy. In 2013, she suffered a chronic Achilles tendon rupture, which resulted in an inability to bear weight on the affected leg.

Surgery was clearly the solution, but this was likely to result in substantial costs that Alja could ill afford on her pension.

Friend and neighbour, Dr Peter Snowdon, stepped in to help.

He drove them to the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Sydney (UVTHS) where Patsy received treatment. It was here that Alja became aware of the financial support available through the Animals in Need Fund, which paid for Patsy’s surgery and recovery.

The Animals in Need fund was launched by the Sydney Faculty of Veterinary Science in 2012. It was established to help cover the cost of much-needed veterinary care for pets from disadvantaged families, or stray and neglected animals and wildlife.

It covers a range of services such as desexing, vaccinations, and surgery to treat trauma or cancer. This support is helping to improve, and in many cases, save the lives of animals in need.

Since launch, more than 570 donors have contributed upward of $32,000 to the fund.

About the Sydney Veterinary School

Sydney Veterinary School has planned to offer a 4-year, graduate-entry Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) for the March 2015 intake.  This DVM program will be a stand-alone, graduate-entry degree, aimed at students who have already attained a bachelor degree and who are accustomed to the challenge of university studies.

The program encourages enrollment of students from diverse backgrounds and aims to help them achieve their goals to become veterinary medical professionals in the global community. Teaching is research-driven to ensure students will learn from the latest developments and advances in evidence-based practice, veterinary science research, animal behaviour and welfare science and veterinary public health. Students will benefit from a fully integrated learning curriculum with clinical exposure, clinical skills training and animal handling commencing in the first semester and throughout the course. Studies will take place in the one health framework, ensuring students understand the linkages between veterinary health, human medicine and the environment at local, national and global levels. The program culminates in a capstone experience year where students will be placed as an intern in veterinary clinics of all varieties and in a wide range of locations, including rotations in the university teaching hospitals at Sydney and Camden.

Students can apply for a position into the DVM after completing any kind of bachelor’s degree at a recognized university, as long as program prerequisite units of study have been met.

Applicants must have completed the following prerequisite units of study at bachelor’s degree level to be eligible for entry:
  • General chemistry (physical and inorganic)
  • Organic chemistry
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry
The minimum GPA for entry is a credit average (minimum 65% overall GPA); however, places are limited and there is a strict quota for this course. Entry is highly competitive so students who have achieved the minimum GPA (and other admission requirements) are then ranked on academic performance. The higher your GPA, the better your chances of receiving an offer.

Melbourne Virtual Fair tomorrow!

Don’t forget: the University of Melbourne is holding a “virtual fair” tomorrow, May 1, for prospective international students and their parents.

 

University of Melbourne
Attend the Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students

Registered participants will be able to
  • get information about the University of Melbourne, their courses and admission requirements;
  • get information about Melbourne—the world’s most liveable city—as well as accommodation options, and student support;
  • chat online with University of Melbourne staff and current international students to really get an understanding of what it’s like to study in Melbourne; and
  • see and hear video presentations from leading academics and current international students.
Australia time: Thursday, May 1, and Friday, May 2, 2014

Ontario time: Thursday, May 1 from 5 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Need to find your local time zone? Visit Time Zone Converter: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

The Virtual Fair is an excellent opportunity to learn more about Australia’s number one university*. Chat online with Melbourne’s friendly staff and students and find out all you need to know about your program of interest and its entry requirements.

This is a great opportunity to find out more about Melbourne’s popular schools:
  • Melbourne Medical School
  • Melbourne Dental School
  • Melbourne Physiotherapy School
  • Melbourne Veterinary School
  • Melbourne Law School
  • Melbourne Teachers College
  • Melbourne Speech Pathology School
  • Melbourne Audiology School
  • Melbourne Public Health School
  • Melbourne Business School
  • Melbourne Nursing School
  • Melbourne Optometry School
* Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2013-2014; SHJT Academic Ranking of World Universities 2013

    UQ Engineering student speeds up web design process

    If necessity is the mother of invention, then frustration must be its father because that is what drove entrepreneur and University of Queensland engineering student Paul Knittel to develop a visual on-line tool for website designers—Documaps.

    UQ Engineering School
    Study engineering at the University of Queensland

    Documaps has streamlined the recreation of web structures from three steps to just one, significantly reducing the time spent on this process.

    Mr Knittel and his business partner, Tristan Mathias, are offering free subscriptions to the service, for a limited time, to encourage user feedback.

    “Documaps was born from a group of developers frustrated by the waste of time when steps and processes had to be repeated because of inefficient methods of website mapping,” said the UQ Engineering student.

    “With our easy-to-understand visual tool, web developers can plan websites with their clients more efficiently.” 

    Visual sitemaps are essential for organising the architecture of a website’s content before development begins.

    With existing software packages, the same underlying structure needs to be created three times in three different environments: the visual site map, the design document and in the content management system.

    Documaps can save developers about 90 minutes each time with its one-step process.

    Documaps was launched this year, after being fast-tracked through technology start-up incubator ilab, run by UQ’s commercialisation company, UniQuest.

    “Taking part in ilab’s Germinate program was really important for getting our idea ready for subscribers,” Mr Knittel said.

    “The network and resources ilab provided over the last three months has really made a difference to our plans and confidence.

    “We’re about to really kick off the marketing for Documaps and we have some new features to release very soon, such as the capability to import existing websites,” he said. 

    Documaps supports WordPress, Basecamp and Drupal, and the feedback from the free subscriptions should help with adapting the tool for other packages.

    The Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology at UQ is characterized by the quality of its graduates, its international research profile, and its highly successful links to industry.
    • Master of Engineering Science (Specializations: Electrical Engineering, Electricity Market, Software Engineering, Systems Engineering, Undeclared))
    • Master of Information Technology


    Macquarie hosts workshop for community organisations

    On April 29, leaders from community organisations working in the areas of audiology, autism, learning difficulties, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, and speech pathology joined together with key researchers at the CCD Stakeholders’ Workshop, to share their vision for future research impacts.

    Macquarie University
    Study Audiology or Speech Pathology at Macquarie

    Held in the Australian Hearing Hub, in the Macquarie University node of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), this was a special opportunity to further develop and enhance collaborative links between CCD researchers and the organisations that benefit from their work.

    “It is the mission of every ARC Centre of Excellence to engage with its stakeholders,” says Distinguished Professor Stephen Crain, Director of the CCD. “The workshop provides a rare opportunity for researchers to learn more about the practical needs of children and adults with mental health issues, and for community and industry leaders to discuss the potential impact of evidence-based research findings and treatment protocols for meeting the needs of the people they serve.”

    Representatives from the CCD’s key stakeholder organisations outlined how each organisation supports the community and highlighted focus areas for 2014 and beyond.

    Speakers included the following:
    • Dr Trevor Clark, Autism Spectrum Australia
    • Dr Molly de Lemos, Learning Difficulties Australia
    • Mr Bill Gye, OAM, Schizophrenia Fellowship of NSW
    • Professor Greg Leigh, Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children
    • Ms Alison McMurtrie, Learning Difficulties Australia
    • Mr Brendan Moore, Alzheimer’s Australia
    • Professor Jim Patrick, Cochlear Ltd
    • Professor Leanne Togher, Speech Pathology Australia
    Presentations were followed by interactive demonstrations by CCD researchers from all three of the CCD’s nodes and tours of CCD and Cochlear facilities. There were also opportunities for informal networking for researchers and stakeholders throughout the day.

    Research facilities that were showcased included the KIT-Macquarie Brain Research Laboratory, the CCD’s state-of-art Liquid Helium Recovery System, and the research and development laboratories at Cochlear Ltd.

    The KIT-Macquarie Brain Research Laboratory, which includes two world-first magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain imaging systems—one for investigating cognitive processing in children, and a custom-designed MEG system that can be used with children and adults with Cochlear Implants—is one of the world’s most advanced laboratories for brain research.

    The Australian Hearing Hub

    The Australian Hearing Hub unites researchers, educators, clinicians and innovators with expertise in audiology, speech pathology, cognitive and language sciences, psychology, nanofabrication and engineering sciences.

    Macquarie University’s Australian Hearing Hub is a global leader in speech, hearing and language research. The Australian Hearing Hub leverages the university’s extensive international expertise in language sciences and cognitive sciences research, and in clinical research and professional training teams in audiology and speech language pathology.


    Sydney Public Health School’s vision, mission, and values

    Public health analyses and acts upon the problems that prevent us from enjoying a good healthy life. It also promotes ways in which we can achieve justice for people no matter what their background. Achieving these goals comes in many forms: generating knowledge of the public health problem, advocating for change and solutions, and helping implement those changes. The Sydney Public Health School’s teaching and research is driven by the common goal of improving the health of people.

    University of Sydney Public Health School
    Find out how you can study at the University of Sydney

    Vision

    The Sydney Public Health School vision is for a global community where everyone’s needs for good health and well-being are met. The school’s vision extends to those with the greatest need, who would benefit most from improved health and reduced inequalities.

    Mission

    Their mission is to lead improvements in health, well-being and equity in Australia and worldwide by
    • contributing to the definition of public health problems and clinical epidemiology;
    • advancing and disseminating knowledge in public health and clinical epidemiology to inform policy and practice;
    • understanding the social, cultural, political, economic and ethical context of health problems and solutions;
    • promoting action through policy and interventions that focus on systems, places and markets, as well as on individuals and their behaviours; and by
    • excelling in evaluation to improve health policy and practice.
    The Sydney Public Health School will do this by providing high quality, accessible education, conducting outstanding, high-impact research and working in partnership to translate knowledge into policy, action and evaluation. Where possible, they will use the latest technology and media to extend their reach, accessibility and impact in communities well beyond the school vicinity.

    Values

    The University of Sydney School of Public Health values innovation, justice and respect for others. The pursuit of their vision and mission requires integrity, rigorous social and scientific inquiry, and a collegiate environment. The school is committed to
    • its staff members—providing a happy, diverse and supportive work environment;
    • its students—stimulating engaged learning that encourages critical thinking—about old and new ideas, and a culture that promotes originality and honesty;
    • communities—staying connected with communities both by sharing knowledge widely and by communicating directly with those who stand to benefit most, including through contemporary information technology and advancement of open-access publication of research;
    • the public health profession—the advancement of public health and its constituent disciplines, including participating in all activities that support the peer review system and advancement of ideas;
    • its partners—working in partnership with government, non-government and other agencies, both within and outside health, to increase the effectiveness and impact of the school’s work;
    • financial responsibility and sustainability.

      University of Sydney School of Public Health

      The Sydney School of Public Health is a vibrant, multidisciplinary network of individuals and centres which combine to provide exceptional and internationally recognized education opportunities in the field of public health. Sydney Public Health School has gained an outstanding reputation for the quality of its research programs and for the expertise of its academic staff.

      The school is renowned for its excellence in teaching in areas such as epidemiology, biostatistics, health promotion, health economics, health advocacy and evidence-based healthcare. Study opportunities include research degrees and coursework master’s degrees, graduate diplomas and in some cases graduate certificates, most of which are open to local and international students.

      Program: Master of Public Health
      Location: Sydney, New South Wales
      Semester intake: March and July
      Duration: 1 year
      Application deadline: May 31, 2014 for the July 2014 intake; and January 31, 2015 for the March 2015 intake.

      Entry Requirements: A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Public Health program requires
      • a minimum four-year full time degree or equivalent qualification from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification; or
      • a shorter degree from the University of Sydney or an equivalent qualification, and non-degree professional qualifications and/or substantial relevant experience and/or other relevant qualifications.


      Tuesday, April 29, 2014

      Australian Endeavour Scholarships for 2015

      Did you know that Canadian students about to study in Australia are eligible to apply for the 2015 round of the Australian Endeavour Awards?

      Established in 2009, the Endeavour Scholarship and Fellowship awards are the Australian Government’s internationally competitive, merit-based scholarship program that provides up to $228,500 AUD for study, research or professional development opportunities between Australia and the world. The program build Australia’s reputation for excellence in education, supports the internationalization of the Australian higher education and research sectors, and offers high-achieving individuals opportunities to increase their knowledge and expertise in their field.

      All recipients will receive
      • $3,000 travel allowance;
      • $4,000 (for scholarships) establishment allowance;
      • $3,000 monthly stipend (paid up to the maximum program duration on a pro-rata basis);
      • tuition fees, paid up to the maximum study/research duration on a pro-rata basis. Tuition includes student service and amenities fees;
      • health insurance for the full program duration (OSHC for non-Australians);
      • travel insurance (excluding during program for non-Australians);
      As a scholarship or fellowship recipient, you will gain invaluable international experience in study, research or professional development. The Department of Education has engaged a contractor to provide post-selection support services to all recipients including a dedicated case manager; pre-departure briefings; provision of advice on health; travel insurance; accommodation; security; payment of allowances; and reporting to the department on the recipient’s progress.

      Endeavour Postgraduate Scholarship

      Degree: Australian Master’s or PhD
      Duration: Up to 2 years for a Masters; up to 4 years for a PhD
      Total per semester: $15,000
      Total: Up to $272,500 (PhD) and $140,500 (Master’s)
      Application deadline: June 30, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. (AEST)

      Applications for the 2013 Endeavour Awards are now open and will close June 30, 2014. Applicants are encouraged to commence their applications early and submit their application as early as possible due to the large volume of users on the system on the final opening days of submission.


      Macquarie Business School: Master of Business Administration (MBA)

      Macquarie University’s Master of Business Administration (MBA)

      Ranked among the world’s top 100 MBA programs (The Economist Which MBA 2012), a Macquarie Graduate School of Management (MGSM) Master of Business Administration (MBA) at the is a learning experience that is both invigorating—and invaluable.

      Providing a strategic business perspective and a complete grounding in the core elements of general management, this program extends, challenges and ultimately, transforms today’s management professional.

      Students of the Master of Business Administration will emerge a potential leader of the future, by focusing on the competitive advantages of enterprise and learning how to manage functional areas and the language they use (not their technical performance).

      The MBA Program comprises 16 course units, including 10 foundation and six elective units.

      Foundation Units
      Ten carefully selected foundation units ensure that students learn the skills required of an effective manager. The 10 foundation units expose MBA students to different general management perspectives, and give them the expertise required to see an organisation achieve and sustain competitive advantage. Foundation units include:
      • Accounting for Management
      • Marketing Management
      • Organisational Behaviour
      • Strategic Frameworks
      • Information and Decision Analysis
      • Economic Context of Management
      • Financial Management
      • Operations Management
      • Foundations of Management Thought
      • Strategic Management.
      Elective Units
      Six elective units are required to complete the program. With a wide variety of management subject areas available, students can tailor their program to focus on a particular management field of interest.

      Internship
      MBA students have the opportunity to develop valuable management skills through a 10-week (one MGSM term) project-based internship. This provides practical experience in an Australian organisation and real exposure to management issues and challenges.   

      Applications for internships are assessed on a competitive basis, including interviews with both the Macquarie Business School and sponsoring organisation. Business students must have successfully completed a minimum of six units of their program to be eligible.

      Master of Business Administration at Macquarie Business School

       

      Degree: Master of Business Administration
      Degree type: Graduate-entry program (1 year)
      Location: North Ryde, Sydney, New South Wales
      Semester intakes: January and June
      Application deadline: While there is no official application deadline, it is recommended that you submit your complete application at least three months in advance of the program’s start date.

      Entry Requirements
      For direct entry into the Macquarie Graduate School of Management MBA, candidates must have an undergraduate degree and a minimum of two years’ relevant work experience (managerial or professional).

      Those without an undergraduate degree, but who have a minimum of five years’ relevant work experience (managerial or professional), can enroll in either a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma and can progress to the MBA via the successful completion of each program level.

      Monday, April 28, 2014

      About the University of Melbourne Master of Nursing Science

      Melbourne Nursing School has developed the Master of Nursing Science program around four interrelated themes:
      1. Approaches to learning and teaching
      2. Research-based practice
      3. Clinical skill acquisition
      4. Contextualised, integrated health care delivery
      The curriculum emphasises significant contemporary health problems identified as National Health Priority Areas: cardiovascular health, cancer control, injury prevention and control, mental health, diabetes mellitus, and asthma.

      University of Melbourne Nursing School
      OzTREKK’s Australian Nursing Schools Admissions Officer Rachel Brady on her visit to Melbourne Uni

      The Melbourne Nursing School takes a research-oriented approach to practice. This approach encourages systematic development of clinical skills using evidence-based learning, an understanding of the close links between theory and practice, and the ability to undertake self-directed lifelong learning.

      Teaching is based on up-to-date research which allows students to apply the most relevant theory to their practice to ensure best practice and best patient outcomes. In the final semester, following theoretical and clinical preparation, students will undertake a specialist elective subject in their area of interest and a capstone practice subject to consolidate theoretical and practical knowledge.

      Program: Master of Nursing Science
      Location: Melbourne, Victoria
      Semester intake: February 2015
      Duration: 2 years
      Application deadline: Friday, October 31, 2014

       

      Admission Requirements

      Admission requirements for the Master of Nursing Science:
      • a three-year bachelor degree, or equivalent, in any discipline, completed within 10 years of application. Where this degree is older than 10 years, the Selection Committee will call for curriculum vitae and consider any graduate study completed in the intervening period to determine current capacity for graduate study, or significant relevant professional experience of greater than five years full-time equivalent.
      • meet the University’s English language requirements.
      From all applicants, the Selection Committee will also call for
      • the contact details of two professional referees; and
      • a supporting statement from applicants indicating their reasons for and ability to undertake the Master of Nursing Science.
      The Selection Committee may conduct interviews to elucidate any of the matters referred to above.

      My bachelor degree was not related to nursing or health sciences. Can I still apply?

      Yes, you can apply on the basis of a bachelor degree in any discipline.
      Applicants are assumed to have knowledge of human anatomy. Students without such background are strongly encouraged to complete the Melbourne Human Anatomy for Nursing Students subject, which is delivered online.

      The Human Anatomy Preparation course introduces students to the structure and function of the human body. It provides the essential basis for understanding the cellular building blocks of the body and the relationships between scientific principles and laws. Students are introduced to cells, tissues and organs, and this program explores the structure and function of body systems. Online schedule:
      • Commencing May 5, 2014 with final exam on June 20, 2014
      • Commencing July 28, 2014 with final exam on September 12, 2014
      • Commencing October 13, 2014 with final exam on November 28, 2014

      Sydney Health Sciences focuses on forgotten families following workplace death

      University of Sydney academics are advocating for a greater focus on the emotional, physical and financial toll of sudden workplace death on surviving families.

      “The impact of a sudden, traumatic workplace death for the families of the workers killed is rarely considered beyond the days immediately following the death,” says Associate Professor Lynda Matthews from the Sydney Faculty of Health Sciences.

      University of Sydney Health Sciences
      Study health sciences at the University of Sydney

      “This is mainly because the formal procedures and investigations are focused on making judgments about possible breaches of law. They do not recognise families’ need for timely information, support and justice.

      “Despite some efforts to support them, families often experience extreme isolation.”

      Associate Professor Matthews and colleagues are conducting a world-first study to identify improvements that will help to better manage the consequences for families.

      This follows a 2011 pilot study which showed profound long-term suffering for families.

      “Our interviews revealed psychological problems such as depression and anxiety, and long-term physical health consequences like obesity, and all of this on top of financial stress,” commented Professor Matthews.

      “The impact on the children involved was particularly disturbing, with family tensions widespread and drug and alcohol use and violence common among adolescent children of deceased workers.”

      This has prompted a call for an increased focus on how formal protocols respond to families following traumatic work-related death.

      Participants in the previous study discussed varying interactions with authorities following the death, with some acknowledging the death in meaningful ways and others responding in ways that families perceived as hurtful.

      “One thing that became very clear was that protocols for keeping families informed of developments regarding inquests, investigations and court cases were not effective and require urgent attention,” the Sydney Health Sciences professor said, adding that despite recent attempts at reform, there is little evidence of regulatory processes meeting families’ needs for information or support at any stage of the post-death process.

      April 28 is the international day of mourning for workplace death. In Australia, more than 5,000 family members of workers become survivors of traumatic workplace death each year.
      Approximately 90 per cent of victims are male. In Canada, approximately four workers die every day, and more than 1,000 die every year because of workplace accidents or from illness caused at the workplace (Canadian Labour Congress).

      Health Sciences at the University of Sydney

      Sydney Health Sciences has a proud history of working with its network of researchers, industry and community partners around the world to produce some Australia’s leading clinicians and foremost thinkers in the health and social policy fields.

      Sydney’s health sciences learning and teaching programs are enhanced by their research efforts and aim to develop a new generation of allied health practitioners, corporate professionals, academics and researchers who will drive change within the health sector. The faculty attracts the best and brightest students from all walks of life and gives them the opportunity to become the future leaders in health.

      Disciplines at Sydney Health Sciences
      • Behavioural & Social Sciences in Health
      • Exercise & Sport Science
      • Medical Radiation Sciences
      • Occupational Therapy
      • Physiotherapy
      • Rehabilitation Counselling
      • Speech Pathology


      University of Queensland turns red for a reason

      The University of Queensland will again be bathed in red for the month of May to raise awareness of multiple sclerosis.

      UQ Medical School
      The Forgan Smith Building at UQ will be bathed in red lights for the month of May

      UQ will switch on red floodlights on the northern side of the Forgan Smith building between dusk and midnight throughout MS Awareness Month.

      Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease in young Australian adults, affecting the central nervous system, attacking the brain and spinal cord and causing irreparable damage.

      UQ School of Medicine researcher Professor Michael Pender said the university was conducting research that could lead to the development of new therapies.

      “These therapies aim to prevent and treat MS by controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection,” he said.

      “Evidence indicates that infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, which is normally kept under tight control by CD8 T cells, has a role in the development of MS.

      “Our current research is investigating the cause and consequence of impaired CD8 T cell immunity to Epstein-Barr virus in MS,” Professor Pender said.

      There is no known cause for MS, and diagnosis in Australia is rising with five Australians being diagnosed every working day.

      The University of Queensland is one of many major sites across the State to become a “Red Supporter” throughout May, MS Awareness Month.

      UQ Property and Facilities Division Maintenance Manager Contracts Glenn Vickery said UQ participated in the annual event to raise awareness among staff, visitors and students.

      “Other sites lighting up to raise awareness are King George Square, Kurilpa Bridge, Skypoint Observation Deck in the Gold Coast, Toowoomba City Hall and Paronella Park in Cairns,” he said.

      MS Queensland urges the public to get involved with the Kiss Goodbye to MS campaign and support Australian research into treatment, prevention and ultimately finding a cure for MS.

      Wear red lipstick, dare others to go red and share the message with a Kiss Goodbye to MS event.


      UQ Law School mooters crowned Jessup world champions

      The University of Queensland Law School is celebrating the addition of a world championship title to its growing list of mooting accolades after winning the 2014 Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in Washington DC, USA.

      UQ Law School School
      Study law at UQ Law School
      The UQ Law School team—Emily Chalk, Camille Boileau, Hugo Clark-Ryan, Abbey Mawby and Lisa Lee—defeated the Singapore Management University School of Law in the White and Case Jessup World Championship Round of the competition on April 13.

      UQ Dean of Law Professor Sarah Derrington said she was thrilled by the team’s “phenomenal” achievement in winning both the prestigious world title and awards for the Best Applicant Written Argument, and Best Speaker in the Final, presented to Emily Chalk.

      “I offer the team my warmest congratulations on behalf of everyone at the law school, and also wish to thank the team’s coaches, Associate Professor Anthony Cassimatis and law alumna Catherine Drummond, for their indefatigable support throughout the competition,” said Professor Derrington.

      Professor Derrington praised Ms Chalk’s feat in winning a second Best Speaker award at an international level, repeating her successful performance at the International Maritime Law Arbitration Moot in 2013.

      It was the second Jessup world title for Associate Professor Cassimatis, who also coached the UQ team that won the competition in 2005.

      “I’m so proud of the team. To win any one of the Jessup finals awards is a tremendous achievement but to win all three is unprecedented,” Associate Professor Cassimatis said.

      “I want to thank all our supporters for their help in preparing the team for Washington, including Catherine Drummond, UQ Chancellor John Story, The Hon Justice Margaret White, The Hon Justice Glen Williams, and law firms Minter Ellison and Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer.”

      University of Queensland Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj also praised the students for their significant achievement.

      “To successfully argue a complex legal case on the world stage is no mean feat and reflects the enormous talents of the TC Beirne School of Law team,” Professor Høj said.

      “I offer Emily, Camille, Hugo, Abbey and Lisa my warm congratulations on their achievement.”

      The Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Competition was founded in 1959 and has become the world’s largest mooting contest.

      More than 600 teams from 85 countries take part in the competition’s regional rounds for a chance to compete in the White and Case championship rounds held in Washington every April.

      The UQ Law team secured its spot in Washington by winning the Australian rounds of the competition at the High Court of Australia in Canberra on 8 February.

      The annual event requires mooting teams to solve an international controversy based on a fictional dispute between countries before the International Court of Justice, the judicial organ of the United Nations.

      In 2014, the problem concerned a conflict arising from maritime development and conservation, and involved criminal jurisdiction and maritime salvage rights.

      Entry Requirements for UQ Law School

      To be eligible to apply to the University of Queensland Bachelor of Laws (graduate entry), you must have the following:
      • Completed or be completing an undergraduate degree
      • Achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average (cGPA) of 75%
      It is recommended that you apply for the UQ Law School’s LLB program if you have achieved a minimum cGPA of 75%, as above. Please note that this is a minimum average to be eligible to apply and that your application outcome will be determined by the University of Queensland. Each applicant’s average is calculated over all years of university study.

      The University of Queensland Law School does not require the LSAT for entry.

      Friday, April 25, 2014

      OzTREKK Funny Friday

      An elementary school teacher decided to poll the class on the difficulty of their math homework assignment.

      Australian Teachers Colleges in Australia
      Become a teacher, have problems—math problems!

      “How many people were able to complete the assignment without parents’ help?” she asked, looking for a show of hands.

      About 25% of the students raised their hands.

      “How many people we able to complete the assignment with the help of a parent?”

      About 70% of the students their hand.

      At this, the teacher notices about 5% of the class did not raise their hands.

      She then called out, “How many people had to help a parent complete your assignment?”

      Australian Teachers Colleges

      Are you thinking of becoming a teacher? Completing an Australian teacher education program provides an excellent opportunity to obtain the teaching qualifications you need, while experiencing the excitement and culture of living in a new country.
      • James Cook University Teachers College
      • Macquarie University Teachers College
      • Monash  University Teachers College
      • University of Melbourne Teachers College
      • University of Newcastle Teachers College
      • University of Queensland Teachers College
      • University of Sydney Teachers College


      Teacher education at Macquarie University

      The Macquarie University School of Education's teacher education program is widely acknowledged as one of Australia’s finest. The program is distinguished by the emphasis it attaches to the concept of the scholar-teacher, its promotion of reflective classroom practice, and its innovative, school-based, professional experience program. A focus on the application of information and communication based technologies in educational settings is integrated across our programs. Macquarie’s developmental model of professional experience allows students to apply the knowledge and skills they develop on campus in a classroom setting.

      Macquarie University School of Education
      Macquarie University campus, Sydney

      The School of Education at Macquarie University is committed to an academic, research-based approach to teacher education. At the core of Macquarie’s approach to teacher education is the concept of the scholar-teacher, one who is flexible, responsive to academic needs, reflective, open-minded, confident and adaptable

      Bachelor of Education (Primary)

      The Bachelor of Education (Primary) is a two-year, full-time degree program that qualifies you to work as a primary school teacher. An applicant’s undergraduate studies must meet the requirements of the NSW institute of Teachers Key Learning Area content requirements.

      Key Learning Areas
      • English
      • Mathematics
      • Science and Technology
      • Human Society and its Environment (HSIE)
      • Creative and Practical Arts
      • Physical Education Studies/Health Studies

      Bachelor of Education (Secondary)

      The Bachelor of Education (Secondary) two year full-time program that qualifies you to work as a secondary school teacher. This program is available to graduates of a recognised university holding a Bachelor’s degree which contains an appropriate academic major relevant to the secondary school methodologies offered by the School of Education. It provides a professional qualification for graduates seeking accreditation as secondary teachers and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

      The Macquarie University School of Education offers secondary methodology units in the following subject areas:

      First Teaching Subjects
      • Business Studies
      • Economics
      • English
      • Geography
      • History (Ancient)
      • History (Modern)
      • Languages
      • Mathematics
      • Science
      Second Teaching Subjects
      • Business Studies
      • Economics
      • English
      • Geography
      • History (Ancient)
      • History (Modern)
      • Languages
      • Legal Studies
      • Society and Culture

      Bachelor of Education (Primary or Seconary)

      Program: Bachelor of Education (Primary or Secondary)
      Location: North Ryde (Sydney)
      Semester intake: March (and August for Secondary)
      Program duration: 2 years full time
      Application deadline: Although there is no strict application deadline, it is recommended that students apply at least three months prior to the program start date. Doing so will provide students with a sufficient amount of time to complete the assessment and pre-departure process.

      Melbourne launches intercalated Doctor of Medicine/Master of Public Health

      Monday, March 17 saw the launch of the intercalated  Doctor of Medicine (MD) and Master of Public Health (MPH) offered by the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne. This program, the first of its kind in Australia, offers medical students the opportunity to undertake the Master of Public Health between the third and fourth years of their medical studies, providing them with the opportunity to be trained and engaged in public health prior to undertaking their advanced medical training.

      University of Melbourne Medical School
      Study at the University of Melbourne

      Rob Moodie, Professor of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, said at the launch that the intercalated program was established to equip medical students with a thorough grounding in public health and better prepare students to develop as globally minded leaders.

      “This program is a response to a real and growing interest in public health among medical students and professionals,” said Professor Moodie.

      “Whether these students will continue to work clinically or whether they’ll shift to a career in public health, these students will finish their medical degrees with a greater understanding of national, state and local health systems—greater insights into how to work within these systems, and a greater understanding of how to contribute to these systems to solve public health problems, both in Australia and internationally.

      “What I’m keen to see as a result of this program are health clinicians who understand the bigger picture.”

      Professor Moodie studied medicine at the Melbourne Medical School before going on to complete his Master of Public Health at Harvard University. His own capacity to see the bigger picture first emerged when he was a young doctor working in refugee camps treating children with preventable diseases. He has gone on to a career in public health advocacy and leadership spanning 35 years. He says his early medical training has played a critical role in preparing him to work effectively in communities across the globe.

      Professor Jim Best, Head of the Melbourne Medical School, congratulated the inaugural cohort of students for adding a highly valuable extra year to their MD program.

      “This new program will equip students with the technical and leadership skills to face the great medical and public health challenges of this century,” said Professor Best. “Thanks to the generosity of donors to the University of Melbourne, each student will undertake their MPH with the support of a full scholarship.”

      Professor Terry Nolan, Head of the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, said that in its first intake the MD/MPH program has been successful in attracting high calibre students who are committed to making a difference in public and global health.

      Visopiano Sanyü, one of eight students who form the inaugural cohort of the MD/MPH, moved to Australia from her native Nagaland with her family when she was 6 years old. The move to Australia and her memories of Nagaland have had a profound impact on Ms Sanyü, shaping her ambition to effect positive change in the world as a global health practitioner. Ms Sanyü’s commitment to social justice and global health has been realised through her involvement with REACH (Realising Education and Access in Collaborative Health), a student-driven health initiative that promotes social change. Her work with REACH has seen the launch of Australia’s first student-run clinic, a multidisciplinary, after-hours service which treats clients from refugee and migrant backgrounds in Melbourne’s northern and western suburbs.

      “Social justice and global health are huge passions of mine. That’s why I chose to study medicine—to work with communities around the world to improve their health through empowerment and sustainable development,” Ms Sanyü says.

      Ms Sanyü describes being part of the first cohort of the dual  MD/MPH as an extraordinary privilege—and one that she would not have had the opportunity to pursue had it not been for the generous support provided.

      “The scholarship provides so much more than financial assistance,” she says. “It contributes to my well-being by relieving the mental and physical burden of having to support myself during my studies. I’m extremely grateful. ”

      Melbourne launches intercalated Doctor of Medicine/Master of Public Health

      Monday, March 17 saw the launch of the intercalated  Doctor of Medicine (MD) and Master of Public Health (MPH) offered by the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne. This program, the first of its kind in Australia, offers medical students the opportunity to undertake the Master of Public Health between the third and fourth years of their medical studies, providing them with the opportunity to be trained and engaged in public health prior to undertaking their advanced medical training.

      University of Melbourne Medical School
      Study at the University of Melbourne

      Rob Moodie, Professor of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, said at the launch that the intercalated program was established to equip medical students with a thorough grounding in public health and better prepare students to develop as globally minded leaders.

      “This program is a response to a real and growing interest in public health among medical students and professionals,” said Professor Moodie.

      “Whether these students will continue to work clinically or whether they’ll shift to a career in public health, these students will finish their medical degrees with a greater understanding of national, state and local health systems—greater insights into how to work within these systems, and a greater understanding of how to contribute to these systems to solve public health problems, both in Australia and internationally.

      “What I’m keen to see as a result of this program are health clinicians who understand the bigger picture.”

      Professor Moodie studied medicine at the Melbourne Medical School before going on to complete his Master of Public Health at Harvard University. His own capacity to see the bigger picture first emerged when he was a young doctor working in refugee camps treating children with preventable diseases. He has gone on to a career in public health advocacy and leadership spanning 35 years. He says his early medical training has played a critical role in preparing him to work effectively in communities across the globe.

      Professor Jim Best, Head of the Melbourne Medical School, congratulated the inaugural cohort of students for adding a highly valuable extra year to their MD program.

      “This new program will equip students with the technical and leadership skills to face the great medical and public health challenges of this century,” said Professor Best. “Thanks to the generosity of donors to the University of Melbourne, each student will undertake their MPH with the support of a full scholarship.”

      Professor Terry Nolan, Head of the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, said that in its first intake the MD/MPH program has been successful in attracting high calibre students who are committed to making a difference in public and global health.

      Visopiano Sanyü, one of eight students who form the inaugural cohort of the MD/MPH, moved to Australia from her native Nagaland with her family when she was 6 years old. The move to Australia and her memories of Nagaland have had a profound impact on Ms Sanyü, shaping her ambition to effect positive change in the world as a global health practitioner. Ms Sanyü’s commitment to social justice and global health has been realised through her involvement with REACH (Realising Education and Access in Collaborative Health), a student-driven health initiative that promotes social change. Her work with REACH has seen the launch of Australia’s first student-run clinic, a multidisciplinary, after-hours service which treats clients from refugee and migrant backgrounds in Melbourne’s northern and western suburbs.

      “Social justice and global health are huge passions of mine. That’s why I chose to study medicine—to work with communities around the world to improve their health through empowerment and sustainable development,” Ms Sanyü says.

      Ms Sanyü describes being part of the first cohort of the dual  MD/MPH as an extraordinary privilege—and one that she would not have had the opportunity to pursue had it not been for the generous support provided.

      “The scholarship provides so much more than financial assistance,” she says. “It contributes to my well-being by relieving the mental and physical burden of having to support myself during my studies. I’m extremely grateful. ”



      JCU studies impact of plastic waste on marine life

      Plastics choke our marine life—but is the message getting through?

      A new James Cook University project is helping assess whether we are winning the war on informing people about plastic waste and its devastating impacts on the marine environment.

      JCU Environmental Sciences
      JCU tells the world how plastics are devastating marine environments (Photo: Mike Ball Dive Expeditions)

      JCU researchers are conducting surveys, both in person and online, to help gauge people’s attitudes toward disposing of materials, plastics in particular, and its impacts on tropical ecosystems.

      Associate Professor Mark Hamann, from JCU’s School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, said marine debris was a key conservation issue for tropical environments and a threat to many species, especially marine turtles.

      “The challenge is to find effective ways to change human behaviour with regard to the consumption and disposal of debris, especially plastics,” Associate Professor Hamann said.

      “Social marketing offers frameworks and processes to encourage this kind of human behaviour change.

      “The project will generate data that can be used in the development of more effective behaviour change programs in environmental protection.”

      Associate Professor Hamann said the issue of marine debris had been identified by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and the Federal Department of Environment and Water Resources as both a key conservation issue for tropical marine ecosystems and a major threat to species including marine turtles and dugongs.

      “The use of social marketing to address sustainability issues is growing and is particularly focused on linking the business sector and consumers to a range of environmental and social issues,” he said.

      The project is designed to help develop effective social marketing campaigns within the tourism sector in tropical Australia focused on wider aspects of environmental protection.

      “Over recent years, the problem of marine debris, specifically plastic pollution, has become a prominent issue concerning many government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGO), and scientific communities around the world.

      “As productivity and consumer buying continues to increase, the amount of plastic that makes its way into the marine environment also continues to rise at an alarming rate. As such, marine debris is now a ubiquitous problem worldwide.”

      Associate Professor Hamann said synthetic marine debris such as plastic was increasingly recognised worldwide as significant risk for many types of marine wildlife.

      “Although plastics have only existed for just over a century, by 1988, thirty million tons of plastic were produced annually, and their versatility has rapidly caused them to become a part of everyday life in developed countries around the world.

      “As plastic has become more prevalent in society and new uses have developed, the quantity of plastic debris entering the marine environment has undergone a corresponding increase.

      “Solutions to plastic pollution need to start with changes in consumer behaviours including selecting products with less plastic packaging, avoiding single-use plastic items, and more careful disposal of rubbish.”

      Associate Professor Hamann said traditional government and NGO responses in this area had relied heavily on information delivery and public education campaigns.

      “Information is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for behaviour change. Persuasive strategies such as social marketing have proven to be more successful than solely information-based strategies.”

      The project involves three stages, starting with a survey conducted in key locations in the Townsville region to collect data from local residents and tourists.

      It will measure awareness of, attitudes towards, and actions related to marine debris, threats to marine turtles and consumer behaviour related to plastics.

      The research has been conducted with the support of Reef HQ Aquarium Turtle Hospital and SeaLink.

      JCU School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

      The School of Earth & Environmental Sciences (SEES) is a leading research entity in JCU, and plays a vital role in maintaining and enhancing the university’s international profile.The school’s strategic intent is to be the top research and education centre for the study of earth and environmental sciences in the tropics, and to provide high-quality, internationally competitive courses that reflect the unique environment represented by northern Australia and the southwest Pacific region. To this end, the school aims to expand knowledge and understanding of the Earth’s complex systems, its natural resources and human interaction with the physical and biological environment, to promote responsible Earth stewardship.

      The major research and teaching disciplines:
      • Economic Geology and Mineral Exploration
      • Environmental Earth Sciences
      • Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management
      • Fisheries Science and Management
      • Geography and Spatial Sciences
      • Geology, Geodynamics and Tectonics
      • Tropical Urban and Regional Planning


      Ten reasons to study at Sydney Dental School

      If you’re interested in studying dentistry at an Australian Dental School, you’ve probably considered the University of Sydney. Sydney Dental School has come up with 10 reasons why they stand out from the rest.

      1. The Sydney Faculty of Dentistry has a proud and successful history of more than 100 years of dental education. They are consistently ranked among the top dentistry schools in the region.

      Sydney Dental School
      Learn more about Sydney Dental School
      2. The modern curriculum focuses on medical, behavioural and clinical sciences, while developing problem-solving and critical thinking skills.

      3. The courses emphasise clinical experience, beginning in the first year of study, through the Sydney Dental Hospital and Westmead Centre for Oral Health, as well as regional rotations including Bathurst, Bowral, Albury, Cessnock, Dubbo and Ballina.

      4. Students receive outstanding supervision and teaching by leading dental professionals, researchers and academics.

      5. Students will be able to practice as a dental health professional (oral health therapist, dentist or dental specialist) immediately after graduating.

      6. Sydney Dental School offers numerous research training opportunities with links to other health faculties, focusing on general and oral health issues in local, national and international communities.

      7. Students can embark on a journey of intellectual discovery by participating in research around the priority themes of chronic disease management and  healthy ageing.

      8. Dental students have access to student membership of prestigious, professional associations, which provide mentoring, support and real-world advice.

      9. A dynamic student association, the Sydney University Dental Association (SUDA), unites and leads the student community.

      10. The faculty has a commitment to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, through dental services, oral health education and  research in partnership with Aboriginal Medical Services in regional communities.

      University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)

      The Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) has been purposefully designed to adhere to the well-rounded course structure of the North American postgraduate dental school model, but has also maintained the sophisticated clinical training for which the University of Sydney has come to be renowned, giving students an applicable knowledge of dental health from the community to the laboratory.

      Sydney Dental School is about comprehensive learning, and embracing all the aspects of becoming a successful dentist. Sub-units integrate academic disciplines such as endodontics and orthodontics with the requisite training needed to evolve dental health knowledge into the highly specialized skills of a dental health professional.

      Students seeking to pursue careers beyond simply practicing dentistry can learn about their options from the members of the several research initiatives housed in Sydney’s Faculty of Dentistry including the “Cellular Molecular Pathology Research Unit,” the “Jaw Function and Orofacial Pain Research Unit,” and the world’s oldest-named dental institute, Sydney’s own “Institute of Dental Research.”

      Application Timeline

      Application deadline for the 2015 intake: July 7, 2014 (10 a.m. Sydney time)
      Interview invitations: July 16 – 19, 2014
      Interviews held: July 28 – August 1, 2014 & August 4 – 5, 2014
      Offers will begin to be sent: August 11, 2014
      Late round interview invitations: September 29 – October 2, 2014
      Late round interviews held: October 13 – 15, 2014
      Late round offers: October 20, 2014


      Thursday, April 24, 2014

      UQ School of Medicine help find breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C

      A breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C that halves treatment time has been developed in an international clinical trial that included the University of Queensland.

      UQ School of Medicine
      Learn more about UQ Medical School

      The landmark study has been published in The New England Journal of Medicine in a paper co-authored by Professor Darrell Crawford, head of the UQ School of Medicine and director of the Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation.

      Professor Crawford said the findings could have a significant, positive impact on millions of patients living with hepatitis C around the world.

      “This treatment regime works in half the amount of time as existing treatments with considerably fewer side effects,” Professor Crawford said.

      “Current hepatitis C treatments include medications administered by injections for 24 to 48 weeks, which often cause many severe side-effects, such as anxiety and depression.

      “Treatment in this study was administered orally for only twelve weeks with less than one per cent of trial participants discontinuing due to side effects.”

      The medical research was conducted at 79 sites across the world, including four in Australia.

      The Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation’s Clinical Trials Unit, based at Greenslopes Private Hospital, was the first site to enroll a patient outside the USA.

      This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial where all participants had been diagnosed with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the type 1 genotype and had not previously taken medications to treat the HCV infection.

      Half the participants received the new treatment regime for 12 weeks while the other half did not receive treatment.

      The groups were then reversed, thereby allowing all participants to be treated with the new drugs.

      The new “triple therapy” treatment was taken in combination with ribavirin (RBV).

      It is estimated that 130 to 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C. (WHO, 2014). In 2011, about 226,700 people in Australia were living with chronic hepatitis C. (The Kirby Institute, 2012).

      About the UQ Medical School Program

      As of 2015, the University of Queensland intends to implement a Doctor of Medicine (MD) program, a four-year graduate-entry program, which will replace the current four-year Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program.

       

      Entry Requirements

      • Completed degree (Bachelor, Master, PhD)
      • GPA equivalent to 5.0 on UQ’s 7.0 scale
      • MCAT score (minimum of 8/8/8 or 8/8/M/8) or GAMSAT score (minimum of 50 in each section)
      • Compulsory consultative meeting with the UQ School of Medicine

      Who Should Apply

      Students who have completed their MCAT and have met the minimum MCAT requirements, and those who have completed their studies with a minimum 65% cumulative average are encouraged to apply.

      University of Melbourne mechanical engineer honoured

      The Australian Academy of Science has elected University of Melbourne Professor Ivan Marusic, from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, for his outstanding contributions and applications of scientific research.

      Distinguished scientists are elected every year by their peers to be part of this elite Fellowship.

      “They are the Olympic athletes of science,” said Suzanne Cory, President of the Australian Academy of Science.

      Professor Marusic, who completed his Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) and PhD at the University of Melbourne, was elected for his contributions to fluid mechanics and advancing our understanding of wall-bounded turbulent flows, with applications from aquatic ecosystems to aircraft drag reduction. Aircraft spend about half of their fuel overcoming turbulence, meaning that any improvement in this area has implications for not only the cost of air travel, but also its contribution to carbon emissions.

      Professor Marusic said that it was not only an honour for him, but his team and Australian fluid mechanics researchers more generally.

      “This is an area in which Australia has been traditionally very strong—it’s a great recognition for the field as well,” he said.

      Professor Marusic joins University of Melbourne colleagues Professor Barbara Howlett from the School of Botany and Professor Ingrid Scheffer from the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health as 2014 Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.

      The University of Melbourne is currently ranked 1st in Australia to 17th in the world for mechanical engineering! (2014 QS World University Rankings)


      Monash reports on medicine collections from Australian pharmacies

      Senator the Honourable Fiona Nash, Assistant Minister for Health, has launched the findings of a landmark audit of collections of out-of-date and unwanted medicines sampled from pharmacies all over Australia, conducted by the Centre for Medicine Use and Safety (CMUS), Monash University.

      Monash Pharmacy School
      Study pharmacy at Monash University

      The survey found that an estimated 540 tons of medicines annually are subjected to environmentally safe disposal by the Return Unwanted Medicines (RUM) Project, and of that total, 44% had not expired.

      The majority of medicines (68%) belonged to five therapeutic classes: cardiovascular (18%), nervous system (17%), alimentary tract (16%), respiratory (9%) and anti-infective (8%)—which correlates well with PBS dispensing data.

      Of the most commonly discarded medicines, insulin (in all its forms), salbutamol, paracetamol, frusemide and glyceryl trinitrate were the top 5.

      Eighty-five percent of the returned medicines were scheduled—1% Schedule 4, and 9%, 8% and 2% Schedule 2, 3 and 8 respectively.

      The Monash report concludes that the National Returned & Disposal of Unwanted Medicines (NatRUM) Program is a critically important and highly viable public health initiative, safeguarding the health of consumers in Australia, and the environment.

      The chairman of NatRUM, Mr Warwick Plunkett said, “The results of the audit have provided a valuable insight into the utilization of the NatRUM program by pharmacists as well as some of the medicine consumption and hoarding habits of the public. These findings are likely to generate a number of important recommendations for government and pharmacy organizations around the PBS and the pharmacist’s role in dispensing medications and their ongoing management.

      The audit also underlines the important role NatRUM plays in the government’s QUM policy with the removal of outdated and unwanted medicines from the home, in an environmentally appropriate way, while reducing dramatically the potential hazards of misuse and accidental poisoning that such hoarding can produce.

      About Monash University’s Bachelor of Pharmacy

      Monash University’s Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) program produces graduates with a sound knowledge and understanding of the science, technology and practice behind pharmacy as a profession. It comprises four major areas of study: medicinal chemistry (the chemistry of drugs); pharmacology (the action of drugs); pharmaceutics (the presentation and delivery of drugs); and pharmacy practice (the application of all these to the professional practice of pharmacy).

      Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm)
      Location: Melbourne, Victoria
      Semester intake: February 2015
      Duration: 4 years
      Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by Monash University to submit their Bachelor of Pharmacy applications before the end of September for the February intake.


      Sydney geosciences professor talks about disaster response

      In 2010, a tsunami generated by an earthquake in Chile led to much of Australia’s east coast being put on a tsunami alert.

      “The detection and warning systems all operated perfectly but what didn’t function was people’s response—with hundreds, possibly thousands, of people flocking to beaches to witness the arriving tsunami,” said Professor Dale Dominey-Howes, from the University of Sydney’s School of Geosciences.

      University of Sydney Environmental Sciences
      Sydney studies natural disasters, like floods

      The incident perfectly illustrates some of the complexities of responding to natural hazards and their associated disasters, including how our perception of the risk influences our response.

      Last month, Professor Dominey-Howes presented “Planet Terror: Is Earth Becoming More Dangerous?” at a Sydney Science Forum where they discussed what people can we do about preparing for, and responding to, natural disasters.

      Professor Dominey-Howes leads the university’s Hazards Research Group in examining some of the major types of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, tropical cyclones, epidemics and even asteroid impacts with the Earth.

      “Understanding where, when, how and why natural hazards and disasters occur is an essential building block for supporting the ‘tool box of safety risk management’ used by our emergency services and governments,” said Professor Dominey-Howes.

      “But how individuals, families, communities, governments and businesses all collaborate in the preparation and response parts of the disaster cycle is as important to successful disaster management as informing and educating people about a threat.”

      For us to improve our disaster resilience we need to recognise that emergency and government services cannot work in isolation, Professor Dominey-Howes explains.

      From individuals to local government to the life support utilities that support our modern society—disaster awareness and the ability to work in partnership are crucial.

      “Individuals and families need to take personal responsibility—’safety starts with self’ as I put it. To help people do that, outreach and education of the public has to be appropriate, especially for those who are most vulnerable,” said the School of Geosciences professor.

      “Physically and economically we are all at potential risk from natural hazards but some individuals, communities and societies are more at risk than others and sustain greater losses following natural hazard events and their associated disasters.

      “That vulnerability might be because of location or because they are socially isolated, physically challenged or less able to access education materials. Taking that into account is part of successful disaster management,” said Professor Dominey-Howes.

      Sydney School of Geosciences

      Part of the Faculty of Science, School of Geosciences at the University of Sydney focuses on the three GEOs the disciplines in geoscience form a broad spectrum of knowledge about the Earth.

      Geography is the study of Earth as the home of people. It addresses human-environmental relations, the resulting spatial organization of human activity, as well as interactions with the physical environment, its resources and their geological determinants.

      Geology and geophysics investigates these determinants, from the Earth’s origins and earliest evolution, through its four and a half billion-year history, to the dynamics of how it is currently evolving.
      • Master of Marine Science and Management;
      • Master of Environmental Science and Law; and
      • Master of Science in Environmental Science.
      The School of Geosciences also contributes to teaching within the Master of Human Rights, Master of Sustainability and the Master of Development Studies.


      Wednesday, April 23, 2014

      Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy

      About the Department of Physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne

       

      Established in 1991, the Department of Physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne makes distinctive contributions to the physiotherapy profession and society through learning and teaching, research and knowledge transfer. The Department of Physiotherapy thrives on a community environment with extensive collaborations with stakeholder partners within the acute, private and primary care sectors. The Melbourne Physiotherapy School is within the School of Health Sciences and is friendly and welcoming. Outstanding academics lead innovative entry to practice and postgraduate programs.

      University of Melbourne Physiotherapy School
      Is it time to study physiotherapy at Melbourne?

      Melbourne’s research is world ranked and they have been highly successful is obtaining competitive grants and publishing their research findings. The outstanding teaching and research nexus this provides means Melbourne Doctor of Physiotherapy graduates receive cutting edge evidence and knowledge upon which to base their future practice. Students have access to excellent teaching and learning spaces including a new lecture theatre and tutorial rooms, large practical rooms, a state-of-the-art simulation laboratory and large gait laboratory. Staff have recently moved to new offices in the Alan Gilbert building but teaching and learning and research remain in Berkeley Street.

      What will students gain from the course?

      The Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT) offers a focus on professional commitment, responsibility and clinical leadership through
      • clinical placements in the largest major metropolitan teaching hospitals, primary care, rural and international settings;
      • innovative teaching methods and an extensive clinical program that offers advanced skills that will create work ready and highly employable graduates;
      • being part of one of the largest health sciences faculties in Australia;
      • an international focus to develop skills and attitudes enabling practice in both national and international environments;
      • being part of Australia’s strongest research university; and through
      • opportunities to explore advanced practice (e.g., emergency medicine, sports physiotherapy)

        Program: Doctor of Physiotherapy (DPT)
        Location: Melbourne, Victoria
        Semester intake: February 2015
        Duration: 3 years

        Application Timelines

         

        Melbourne DPT Early Round Applications for the 2015 Intake
        Deadline for prerequisite assessment forms: May 2, 2014
        Deadline for early round applicants: June 6, 2014
        Offers for early round Skype MMI interviews released: June 20, 2014
        Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: June 30, 2014
        Early round Skype MMI interviews conducted: June 30 – July 4, 2014
        Offers for early round released: July 28 – August 1, 2014

        Melbourne DPT Second Round Applications for the 2015 Intake
        Deadline for second round applicants: August 1, 2014
        Offers for second round Skype MMI Interviews released: August 15, 2014
        Applicants not shortlisted for interview notified: August 29, 2014
        Second round Skype MMI interviews conducted: August 25 – 29, 2014
        Offers for second round released: October 13 – 17, 2014
        Deadline for final results and other offer conditions to be met by applicants: December 18, 2014
        Mandatory DPT Orientation: February 6, 2015
        DPT Classes commence: February 9, 2015


        UQ pitch drop touches down

        Remember when we invited you to become a part of UQ’s science experiment? Well, as Cyclone Ita hit northern Australia two weeks ago, a much slower collision occurred in the world’s longest-running lab project, the University of Queensland’s Pitch Drop Experiment! Finally!

        University of Queensland Pitch Drop
        Almost 25,000 people participated in the Ninth Watch
        After a wait of more than 13 years, the ninth drop of pitch collided ever so slowly with the eighth drop in the bottom of the beaker.

        The science experiment was set up in 1927 to demonstrate that solid materials—pitch shatters if hit with a hammer—can flow like liquids.

        Pitch Drop custodian Professor Andrew White said seven drops had fallen between 1930, when the experiment began, and 1988, at an average of one drop every eight years.

        “Two things changed after that—the 2000 (eighth) and 2014 (ninth) drop each took about 13 years to fall, and each collided into the decades-old pile of drops in the beaker before it could break away from the funnel,” he said.

        The eighth drop ran into the seventh drop in 2000, but took almost 14 years to tip over.

        “It was still connected to the ninth drop but almost broke free this year.

        “The connection had become thin, stressed and light grey—but now that the ninth drop has run into it the whole cycle starts again,” Professor White said.

        The stealthy collision is the latest trick by this evasive lump of tar. Until now, no one has ever seen a drop fall.

        The former custodian of the experiment, the late Professor John Mainstone, missed observing the drops fall on three occasions—by a day in 1977, by only five minutes in 1988 when it was on display at the World Expo in Brisbane, and in 2000 when a webcam that was recording it missed the crucial moment when the drop fell during a 20-minute power outage.

        The science experiment was subsequently put under constant surveillance, with three webcams trained on it to capture the ninth drop’s fall.

        Nearly 25,000 viewers from 158 countries have registered to keep an eye on the ninth drop through the live web stream at www.theninthwatch.com.

        Those who were watching when it collided will have their names recorded for posterity.

        “To determine the actual moment, we’re going to analyse the video to see if and when the pitch motion slowed down, and hopefully we can let people know soon,” Professor White said.

        “We look forward to observing what will happen next with the ninth drop.

        “It may tip over quickly or it might slow right down and take years to break away from the imminent tenth drop,” he said.

        UQ School of Mathematics and Physics

        The School of Mathematics and Physics is a dynamic School within the Faculty of Science at the University of Queensland. They are committed to excellence in learning, discovery and engagement.

        The school’s disciplines of mathematics, statistics and physics are internationally recognised and members of its academic staff are leaders in their respective fields. The school is also home to three ARC Centres of Excellence and numerous other research groups.


        JCU students running to beat malaria

        A group of James Cook University students will strap on their sneakers and run 270 km between them along a part of Victoria’s coastline to help raise money for malaria nets for impoverished African communities.

        JCU Medical School
        Study medicine at JCU Townsville

        The JCU student charity group ‘Run to Better Days’ has set its sights on Melbourne and surrounds for its 2014 challenge, with this year’s running crew pounding the pavement of Port Phillip Bay.

        The run involves 13 JCU students, who will also visit schools, universities, rotary clubs and communities in the coastal strip to share an important message: we can all do something about world poverty.

        The students are from different JCU campuses, including Townsville and Cairns, as well as some from Mackay Hospital. There are second, fourth- and fifth-year JCU Medical School students, as well as a fourth-year engineering student.

        All funds raised during the run will go to the Against Malaria Foundation (AMF). The AMF provides malaria nets to communities most at risk of contracting malaria, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa.

        The nets are to use to protect people’s bedding and living areas from mosquitoes. While many Western homes have windows and sealed houses, much of sub-Saharan Africa has nothing but nets to rely on for protection from “mozzies.”

        Run to Better Days co-coordinator Isabel Guthridge said an important aspect of the run was for participants to think about the charities they were supporting and why.

        “Cost-effectiveness and transparency is important to the students on the run,” Ms Guthridge said. “The Against Malaria Foundation is one of the most cost-effective and transparent in the world and has been recommended by several international charity evaluators, including GiveWell and Giving What We Can.”

        Each runner will complete two stints of 10 km each in a 24-hour period. It is similar to the Relay For Life events and will have runners doing 10 km before swapping to the next runner.

        As in previous years, the runners will visit high schools along the route before and after the event to talk to students and teachers about what wealthier societies can do to reduce world poverty.

        Team member Rosie Matthews said Run to Better Days had a large presence in Melbourne, making it the ideal location for this year’s run.

        “We thought we would go to Melbourne and get the high school students involved,” Ms Matthews said. “There are a lot of great young minds down there we can open up to this message,” she said.

        Ms Guthridge said it was often the words of a teacher that were most effective to inspire students.

        “If a teacher says to the students after we’ve finished our spiel, ‘let’s think about this now’ it can be more powerful than hearing us alone,” Ms Guthridge said.

        Matthew Paltridge, co-coordinator of the Run to Better Days, said the AMF recently announced they would be working with the Democratic Republic of Congo, distributing almost 700,000 nets to protect around 1.2 million people.

        “It’s a chronically difficult country to run a charity in, so it’s really quite an achievement for them to have organised this,” Mr Paltridge said.

        The run will be held from from July 19 to 20. School visits will take place in the weeks before and after the run.

        While the exact route has not been decided, it is planned they will start on the eastern side of the bay (Point Nepean) and run anti-clockwise around the bay.

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