Griffith professor one of Australia’s top 10 most influential women

Griffith University’s Professor Lesley Chenoweth AO has been named in the top 10 of Australia’s most influential women.

The Pro Vice Chancellor and Head of Logan Campus won the local/regional category at the Australian Financial Review and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards for 2015 Gala Dinner at Sydney Town Hall. Carnival Australia CEO Ann Sherry won the overall honour.

Griffith University Australia
Professor Lesley Chenoweth AO has been named in the top 10 of Australia’s most influential women (Photo credit: Griffith University)

Professor Chenoweth said she was honoured to be acknowledged as “influential,” especially alongside McGrath Foundation CEO Petra Buchanan, former Federal Health Minister Nicola Roxon, Managing Director of Microsoft Australia Pip Marlow, Australian Army pilot Captain Jennifer Roberts and publisher Louise Adler.

“I believe that all women have the potential to influence, and you don’t have to be in a leadership role to do so,” she said.

“I have met so many wonderful women who have influence in their own way in their own spheres.

“I think the key is to seize opportunities and understand the nature of leadership and influence—there are many opportunities for leadership even when you are at school or just starting your career.”

Professor Chenoweth has led a long and distinguished career in higher education, integrating research, education and community particularly in the areas of social work, people living with disabilities and people often excluded from higher education.

Based at the Logan campus, her work involves partnerships with Logan City Council, community organisations, schools, sporting groups and the whole community to enable more people to achieve more.

“This is made possible through the support of the university to be part of the transformation of a whole community. My vision is for Griffith’s Logan campus to be an aspiration for local young people and others seeking a university education.”

Professor Chenoweth believes her successful career would not have been possible had she not taken up opportunities that came her way.

“I’ve had some amazing opportunities presented to me and I’ve grabbed most of them,” she said. “I’ve also had some great women in my life and cannot stress how important it is to collaborate and work together or seek out mentors at different times.”

Earlier this year Professor Chenoweth was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO).
The 100 Women of Influence Awards aim to highlight the important contribution women make in creating a bold and diverse future for Australia.


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