UON a leader in workplace gender equality

The Workplace Gender Equality Agency recently announced the 2015 WGEA Employer of Choice for Gender Equality (EOGCE) citation holders and the University of Newcastle is proud to be recognised as an Employer of Choice for Workplace Gender Equality.

University of Newcastle
University of Newcastle recognised as an Employer of Choice for Workplace Gender Equality

UON is one of only 90 organisations Australia-wide to be recognised for taking a whole-of-organisation approach to supporting equality of participation in all levels of the workplace.

The citation recognises employer commitment and best practice in promoting gender equity in the workplace.

This year’s applicants were required to consult with employees to demonstrate that gender equality initiatives translated into lived experience.

UON Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Caroline McMillen said that the achievement reflects the range of policies and procedures UON has in place to ensure that staff at UON can thrive in their work.

“This citation also acknowledges the improvements we have recorded since last year in working to achieve gender balance in our leadership group, senior levels of academia and among professional leaders to set the standard for the whole organisation,” Professor McMillen said.

The University of Newcastle’s participation in the Science in Australia Gender Equality program under the Athena Swan charter is one way we are addressing the gender imbalance that still plagues STEM disciplines.

Professor Deb Hodgson, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) is leading an information session with Dr Zuleyka Zevallos from the SAGE program to provide staff with an opportunity to learn more about the SAGE pilot and the role we can play.

UON looks forward to continuing to focus on achieving gender equality across the institution. “There is always more we can and should be doing,” Professor McMillen said.

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