New halls of residence honour past Monash leaders

A new state-of-the-art student living precinct spanning four residential buildings has been officially opened at Monash University by the Honourable Linda Dessau AM, Governor of Victoria. Each of the four new halls of residence has been named in honour of an academic who made a significant contribution to the university and the field in which they worked.

Monash University
New halls of residence honour past Monash leaders (Photo credit: Monash University)

The multi-level buildings will accommodate 1,000 students in self-contained studio apartments, providing affordable and stylish home-away-from-home accommodation in the heart of the Clayton campus. A number of apartments have been designed to accommodate mobility-impaired residents.

The apartments measure approximately 20 square metres and feature impressive kitchen and bathroom facilities and fully furnished living spaces, VOIP telephone handsets and high-speed internet access.

Surrounding landscape, communal spaces, an outdoor cinema, shops, cafes and walkways will be developed in conjunction with the buildings to create a safe and engaging living environment. Located near the centre of the campus, residents enjoy the benefit of being close to cultural and sporting precincts.

The Governor said she was delighted to officially open the new residential facilities, saying the new halls of residence will “significantly enhance the appeal of a Monash education, providing students the opportunity to be at the heart of the increasingly diverse and active community at Monash Clayton.”

Monash University President and Vice-Chancellor Professor Margaret Gardner AO said the apartments had been designed to be sustainable, accessible and to foster a strong sense of community.

“A growing number of students are choosing to live on campus, and Monash is expanding to meet that demand,” Professor Gardner said.

“Through the creation of this new residential community students have access to an affordable, inclusive and sustainable living environment where they can study, build friendships and relax.”

In recognition of their respective contributions to the development of Monash, their leadership and service to the university, the halls have been named in honour of
  • Emeritus Professor Enid Campbell AC OBE – an eminent legal scholar and the first female professor and then dean of a law school in Australia. Professor Campbell earned an international reputation for her research and writing on constitutional and administrative law, and her contribution to legal education.
  • Emeritus Professor Mollie Holman AO – a physiologist, renowned for her contribution to research and development in her field. Professor Holman’s remarkable international reputation as a researcher led to her appointment in 1970 to a Personal Chair in Physiology.
  • Emeritus Professor Malcolm Logan AC – geographer and university administrator, Professor Logan was Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University from 1987 till 1996, a time of momentous expansion and change in its history.
  • Associate Professor Ian Turner – an historian and political activist, Associate Professor Turner taught at Monash in the 1960s and 1970s. He was renowned as an original, brilliant and inspiring teacher, with a great passion for his country, its art, literature and landscape.
The buildings have been designed by three leading Australian architects in line with Monash University’s vision to create true communities in quintessentially Australian styles
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Sustainable design and construction was central to the building development with the aim to achieve a 5-star As-Built rating from the Green Building Council of Australia. The university’s Briggs and Jackomos Halls at the Clayton campus were the first multi-unit residential buildings in Australia to receive this rating. The new halls will take the total number of student rooms to 2,748.

Turner Hall is already taking residents and the remaining halls will be open in time for next year’s intake.


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