Study applied linguistics at the University of Queensland

Linguistics—the scientific study of language—explores how humans communicate by examining the relationships between structure, meaning and context. By studying linguistics at the University of Queensland, you’ll discover how we learn language and use it, change it, share it. You’ll also analyse the social and historical contexts in which various languages are or have been spoken, to understand what distinguishes each language from another. These courses encourage you to develop a deeper understanding of how sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax), signs (semiotics) and meaning (semantics) can create or confound communication success.

Study applied linguistics at UQ
Study applied linguistics at the University of Queensland

Why study Applied Linguistics?

Applied linguistics provides a strong understanding of concepts, current issues and research methods in the core areas of applied linguistics. Students will acquire specialised knowledge of theory and practice in targeted areas of language teaching, technology, and sociolinguistics/ intercultural issues. While studying applied linguistics, students will develop an ability to apply their knowledge to professional and practical tasks in teaching and other areas and an understanding of principal directions in current thinking and applications of the field.

What can you do with a degree in linguistics?

  • Writer
  • Publisher
  • Journalist
  • Lexicographer
  • Consultant
  • Copy writer
Program: Master of Applied Linguistics
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: May 31 and November 30 each year

Entry requirements
  • Approved degree in the same discipline with a GPA of 4.5; or
  • GCAppLing or GDipAppLing with a GPA of 4.5; or
  • Approved degree in any discipline with a GPA of 4.5 and a minimum of two years language teaching experience.

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