Generous gift helps establish a chair of finance at UQ Business School

The UQ Business School will name its Chair in Finance in honour of Malcolm Broomhead, in recognition of a $3-million gift from the alumnus and leading Australian businessman.

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Peter Høj thanked Mr Broomhead for his very generous support and said an international search was under way to fill the newly established Malcolm Broomhead Chair in Finance.

UQ Business School
Malcolm Broomhead (Photo credit: UQ)

“The generous three-million-dollar gift from Malcolm has now made it possible to endow this chair of strategic importance to UQ,” Professor Høj said.

“We are fortunate at UQ to have a strong alumni network whose generosity and support of the next generation is allowing us to extend our programs, attract quality staff and offer transformative student experiences.

“Mr Broomhead’s philanthropy is of a very high order and a fine example to others.

“It will enhance the UQ Business School’s capacity to educate and develop the business leaders of the future.”

Mr Broomhead is Chair of Ascinao Ltd, Chair elect of Orica, and a non-executive director of BHP Billiton Ltd and BHP Billiton Plc.

He was project engineer and construction manager with MIM Holdings in Brisbane when he undertook his MBA at the UQ Business School in the early 1980s.

“The MBA was a career-changer,” Mr Broomhead said. “I was working my way up the professional ladder when I started. The MBA program enabled me to really accelerate my career.”

Mr Broomhead said he found finance the most useful component of his studies, and went on to become a chief financial officer on his way to becoming a chief executive officer.

He said he chose to support the UQ Business School because he believed it was important for those who had been successful to give back and support the education of the next generation.

“UQ Business School is the leading MBA provider outside of North America and Europe,” he said.
“I think having a top business school is really important to the Australian economy—to our standards of living—and also a really important link into Asia.

“I think philanthropically supporting our universities is becoming more important, given our demographics and the competitive nature of education globally.

“We can’t continue to rely on the government to totally fund the education system. It’s important we encourage individuals who have been successful in life to support education.”

Mr Broomhead said Australia had a global competitive advantage in education.

“We may have a small population, but there are real niches where we can be world-class, including medical research and education,” he said.

“We need to ensure we maintain the highest standards possible.”

UQ Business School Academic Dean and Head Professor Andrew Griffiths said the school was seeking an internationally regarded professor with a strong research background who could create a high-quality learning experience for students.

About the UQ MBA

The UQ Business School program is ranked as one of the leading MBAs worldwide and number one in the Asia Pacific region. Its unique features help to set it apart from other MBA programs and provide added value to students.

While all MBA programs aim to develop leadership skills, UQ Business School’s Leadership Capability Framework provides visible evidence of your progress. There is also the chance to put your leadership skills into practice while working with community organisations, to collaborate with the renowned Wharton School on an international consultancy project, and to explore new markets on an MBA immersion tour.

UQ Business School’s reputation for research and its strong links with industry ensure fresh and relevant content, while the flexible study options allow you to fit in your learning alongside lifestyle and work commitments.

Degree: Master of Business Administration
Duration: 1 year
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Application deadline: October 31 each year


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