Monash journalism students named finalists

Two Monash University student journalists are finalists in the Walkley Young Journalist of the Year Awards and the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.

Jack Paynter’s story “Cricket willow tree project drives investors bats” was published in The Age and the Sydney Morning Herald.

Monash journalism students named finalists
Ms Nicola McCaskill and Mr Jack Paynter (Photo credit: Monash University)

It told the story of a group that offered investments in willow trees to make cricket bats, and continued to demand fees from investors despite no sales over 16 years.

His story earned him a place among the top three in the student award section of the Walkley Young Journalist of the Year.

Nicola McCaskill has produced a highly original and award-winning photo essay about a day in the life of a Melbourne sex worker.

Nicola is a finalist for the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship, a paid internship working with some of Australia’s best TV news and current affairs journalists.

Monash Journalism alumna and Leader journalist Therese Allaoui was named a finalist in the Community/Regional Journalism award for the Young Walkleys.

Monash journalism digital journalism coordinator Julie Tullberg said the Young Walkleys were highly competitive among many journalism schools across Australia.

“It’s a credit to Jack to be named a finalist in the Young Walkleys, as there are just three spots up for grabs,” Ms Tullberg said.

“Nicola’s photo essay is brilliant and her talent for photojournalism has been recognised by the judges of the Jacoby-Walkley Scholarship.”

Therese, an award-winning journalist, was recognised for work published in the Mordialloc Chelsea Leader and Port Philip Leader, including “Deadly drugs on salw,” “Players left in the dark,” and “Taste of prosperity.”

The winner of each category will qualify for the Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year and will undertake work experience with CNN, Twitter and Huffington Post in the United States.

Master of Journalism at Monash University

The Master of Journalism is for people who want to enter a career in journalism, and for working journalists who want to extend their skills and explore the intellectual basis of their practice. Students work with award-winning journalists and academics with strong industry links as they cultivate high-level skills in research and reporting across all media—print, online, radio and video—and explore the role of the media in contemporary society.

Program: Master of Journalism
Location: Caulfield Campus, suburb of Melbourne
Duration: 1 – 2 years (depending upon candidate’s educational background)
Semester intakes: March and July
Application deadline: It is recommended that you apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

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