University of Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push

People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push for a long-awaited research breakthrough to develop treatments that for the first time could prevent or mitigate this disabling and potentially life-threatening condition. The University of Melbourne, in partnership with the Royal Melbourne Hospital, is the only Australian institution to take part in the project, funded by one of the largest grants to date awarded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research into the elusive condition.

Melbourne joins Epilepsy Centre Without Walls in $28m global research push
People with epilepsy acquired following brain trauma are the focus of a new $28 million global push (Photo: University of Melbourne)

Some 250,000 Australians suffer from epilepsy, the causes of which range from tumours to infections, genetics, hemorrhages or stroke, in addition to brain trauma.

Principal Investigator neurologist Terry O’Brien said epilepsy caused by traumatic brain injury, the major cause of epilepsy in people aged 15–24, is harder to predict and control than many other forms of epilepsy.

“Up to 20 per cent of people who’ve had a traumatic brain injury will develop epilepsy, yet researchers know very little about why, and have no way to prevent or mitigate it,” Professor O’Brien said.

“It’s the nasty sting in the tail for people who’ve got through a difficult rehabilitation, only to be hit by their first seizure just when they think they’re on the mend—anywhere from six months to two years after they were first injured.

“More than a third of these patients’ seizures can’t be controlled by drugs.”

Professor O’Brien—who is the James Stewart Chair of Medicine and Head of the Department of Medicine (Royal Melbourne Hospital) at The University of Melbourne—said the key to Melbourne’s appeal to be invited to be part of this international research collaboration was its location in the Parkville Precinct.

“Being in the Parkville Precinct will enable clinicians and researchers from disciplines such as neuroscience, electrophysiology, imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology to work very closely together, at the Melbourne Brain Centre and the Royal Melbourne Trauma Centre and ICU.”

The project, one of three NIH Epilepsy Centres without Walls, will be led by researchers at five institutions—the University of Melbourne, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, and the University of Eastern Finland.

About Melbourne Medical School

The Melbourne Medical School is part of the Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences. It is the oldest medical school in Australia and internationally renowned for global leadership in teaching and training, health research, policy and practice. The school encompasses all major fields of medicine and rural health.

Renowned for global leadership in health research, policy and practice, the University of Melbourne educates more health professionals than any other university in Australia.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, the deadline was June 23, 2016.

The Melbourne MD is a four-year, graduate-entry medical program that builds on the University of Melbourne’s reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It enables students to become outstanding medical practitioners who will excel as world-class leaders in their chosen field.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

University of Sydney is closing the veterinary void

Could the next Olympics violate human rights?

Studying at UQ Pharmacy is more than just counting pills