Tuesday, March 28, 2017

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes

Projects tackling key health challenges of antimicrobial use and skin cancer are the first to be funded under a flagship initiative by the University of Queensland Faculty of Medicine.

UQ medicine flagship research program to deliver health outcomes
UQ Centre for Clinical Research

Deputy Executive Dean and Associate Dean of Research, Professor Melissa Brown, said the faculty is committed to progressing worthy world-class research by providing operational support over five years to deliver health outcomes.

“Our Health Outcomes Programs, or HOPs, represent a strategic approach to faculty research, in collaboration with our hospital and health partners,” Professor Brown said.

“These are very specific and targeted programs of research that address an identified health problem and will produce a specific and visible benefit.”

The first project selected will address high rates of infection in critically ill patients by optimising antimicrobial therapy.

The research team will use whole genome sequencing to rapidly determine which bacteria are causing infection so the most suitable drug and dose combination can be given. Once the process is established, the research team will test it in the clinic and determine its benefits to individual patients and the health system.

The project led by Professor Jason Roberts and Professor David Paterson includes researchers from UQ’s Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR) and School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences (SCMB).




The second program to be supported focuses on harnessing technology to address the problem of high melanoma incidence and mortality.

The research team will recruit high risk participants to test targeted screening using 3D total body photography and mobile teledermoscopy in the context of the Australian health care system.

Results will be used to drive evidence-based changes to clinical practice.

The project will be led by Professor Peter Soyer of UQ’s Diamantina Institute and Professor David Whiteman, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, and includes collaborators from QUT, QIMR Berghofer and UQ’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business.

Professor Brown said both teams should be congratulated for working collaboratively to create change and translate research into tangible health outcomes.

“These projects were selected following a competitive application process engaging interstate reviewers in late 2016, and we look forward to seeing them make a difference to health care in the years ahead.”

About the UQ Medical School Program

The UQ School of Medicine conducts a four-year, graduate-entry medical program, the Doctor of Medicine (MD). The School of Medicine is a leading provider of medical education and research in Australia, and with the country’s largest medical degree program, they are the major single contributor to Queensland’s junior medical workforce.

Program: Doctor of Medicine (MD)
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: January
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: Applications are assessed on a rolling admissions (first come, first served) basis. It is recommended that applicants apply as early as possible to increase their chances of timely assessment. This program can fill quickly!


Friday, March 24, 2017

Study law at the University of Newcastle’s NeW Space

The University of Newcastle $95-million landmark education precinct NeW Space in the heart of Newcastle’s CBD is set to be completed this spring. The first classes are due to be held in second semester, and it is estimated that approximately 3,500 students will study at the facility each day.



The new precinct is a significant revitalisation project for the City of Newcastle and will host a range of university-supported activities including
  • business and law programs;
  • digital library services and information commons;
  • collaborative learning and research spaces;
  • facilities for engagement with industry, business and the community;
  • social learning spaces.
Study law at the University of Newcastle's NeW Space
University of Newcastle NeW Space (Image: UON)

Newcastle Law School will be moving to the university’s landmark education precinct, NeW Space in the Newcastle CBD. JD students will enjoy the highest quality social learning spaces, digital library services and information commons, collaborative learning and research spaces, and facilities for engagement with industry, business and the community.

Newcastle Law School Juris Doctor Program

The University of Newcastle is now offering two intakes per year for the Juris Doctor / Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice program.

Program: Juris Doctor / Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice
Location: Newcastle (Callaghan)
Duration: 3 years
Next intakes: June 2017 and Jan/Feb 2018
Application deadline: Candidates are encouraged apply at least three months prior to the program’s start date.

Entry Requirements
Entry to the program is available to students that have successfully completed a 3-year bachelor degree in any discipline other than law, from a recognized institution; or other post-secondary qualification from a recognized institution assessed by the Faculty Pro Vice-Chancellor to be equivalent. Applicants must also meet the English Language requirements of the university.

JCU Dentistry engaging rural communities in oral health

James Cook University was established as Australia’s university for the tropics, and therefore focuses on programs that are particularly relevant to the tropical world. JCU Dentistry was established in 2008 in response to the challenges presented by the oral health needs of rural and remote northern Australia.

JCU Dentistry students are connected to the community

JCU researchers say children in rural Queensland are three times more likely to be admitted to hospital for dental problems than in other parts of the state. To help improve oral health education, JCU partners with communities in research to try to make services work better for people living and working in rural and remote areas.



The university sends its health professional students, including JCU Dentistry students, to remote and rural regions on placements, and to do outreach in schools, and encourages its graduates to return back to rural and remote areas to work after graduation.

Apply to JCU Dentistry directly from high school

If you’re interested in improving the health of people who live in tropical, rural, and remote places, then the Bachelor of Dental Surgery program at JCU might be for you. This five-year undergraduate degree provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to become competent practitioners of dentistry. While it is a broad-based program including all aspects of dental practice, it also has a special focus on issues of special concern to the northern Australian region, particularly those relating to tropical, rural and Indigenous practice.

JCU Dentistry engaging rural communities in oral health
Learn more about JCU dentistry

JCU Dentistry accepts applications from high school graduates or from those who have completed university studies.

Program: Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)
Location: Cairns, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

OzTREKK welcomes two more Australian universities!

Because we like to offer our students as many study options as possible, we now have two more Australian universities offering popular programs like medicine, dentistry, and law! All of us at OzTREKK are pleased to announce that we are now an official Canadian representative of two additional Australian universities: Charles Sturt University, and the University of Western Australia.

Charles Sturt University
Learn more about CSU

Charles Sturt University

First, meet Charles Sturt University! Established in 1989, it was named in honour of Captain Charles Sturt, a British explorer who made expeditions into regional New South Wales and South Australia.

While CSU has many campuses located in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, and the Australian Capital Territory, most students will be headed to Orange, New South Wales, for their Bachelor of Dental Science program. Nestled in the Central Tablelands of NSW, 260 km west of Sydney, Orange is a progressive city with a friendly country atmosphere. The city’s 38,000 residents enjoy excellent retail, sporting, educational and health services. With two movie cinemas, restaurants offering a range of cuisine, popular Farmers’ Markets, wineries and an annual FOOD Week, Orange combines boutique shops, sporting facilities, and quality educational and health services.

University of Western Australia
Learn more about UWA

University of Western Australia

How about heading to the west coast of Australia for a change? If so, you’re in for a treat: Perth, Australia is incredibly beautiful, and you get to enjoy stunning sunsets over the Indian Ocean!

The University of Western Australia is a research-intensive university and one of the internationally recognised Australian Group of Eight (which also includes the University of Queensland, the University of Sydney, the University of Melbourne, and Monash University).

Students will be happy to know that UWA offers three in-demand degree options for Canadian students:
  • Doctor of Medicine
  • Doctor of Dental Medicine
  • Juris Doctor
UWA’s picturesque Crawley campus is located on the Swan River just 10 minutes from Perth. The campus offers you a range of cafes, bookshops, banks, a vibrant cultural precinct, myriad clubs and societies, a supportive Student Guild, and on- and off-campus accommodation options.



Tuesday, March 21, 2017

UQ School of Veterinary Science supports international students

Moving to a new country can be daunting. So can starting at a new university, and doing both at once can be a real challenge! The UQ School of Veterinary Science helps international students make a smooth and successful transition to life and studying on Gatton Campus.

UQ vet science supports international students
UQ School of Veterinary Science supports its international students! (Photo: UQ)

International student representatives

In each year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Hons) program, two international year representatives are elected. They provide a collective voice for international students in a single year and are the first contact for international student issues. The international year representatives also discuss international student issues with the veterinary school international student mentor, organise international students’ events and provide mentoring services to international students.

Email addresses for international year representatives will also be provided to international students of each year.

International student representatives
  • communicate any international students issues directly with the international student mentor;
  • develop and maintain an international student Facebook page;
  • help organise events;
  • are involved in the international student peer-support/mentoring.

 

Peer support for international students

An international (peer) mentor is a current student who volunteers their time to help new students settle into life in Gatton and study at the UQ School of Veterinary Science.  All new students have to make adjustments to be successful at university.  Mentors provide peer support and thus a student’s perspective of university life by sharing their experiences, challenges and insights.  The international student mentors are a mix of local and international students working together to assist new students from the time they arrive in Australia, attend orientation and throughout the semester.

Academic mentor for international students

Dr Joerg Henning is the International Student Mentor at the School of Veterinary Science. He liaises directly with international students and international student representatives and provides support, guidance and advice on any issues that might be important for international students.

 

UQ Bachelor of Veterinary Science Honours

The vet program at the University of Queensland is one of the most sought after in Australia, attracting the very best students and producing veterinarians that are in high demand, both domestically and internationally. The university’s Bachelor of Veterinary Science provides the broadest base in the biological sciences of any undergraduate course and provides a very wide range of career options as well as its professional qualifications, enabling graduates to practice veterinary medicine and surgery.

Program: Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)
Location: Gatton, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: UQ Veterinary School has a general application deadline of November 30; however, late applications may be accepted. It is strongly recommended that students apply a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Sydney Architecture students learn “real life” lessons from affordable housing project

The Indigenous community of Yarrabah in far north Queensland was the focus of architecture who were given the unique opportunity to work with community leaders on an affordable housing project.

Known as the Burri Gummin (‘one fire’) Affordable Housing Project, the students were contributing to an ongoing housing project led by a working party of Yarrabah Traditional Owners and local residents.



The project was facilitated by two Cairns-based, non-profit organisations: Worklink, an employment support group, and the Centre for Appropriate Technology, servicing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities living in remote areas of Australia.

Sixteen Master of Architecture students were invited onto Gunggandji country in far north Queensland to consult with community leaders on environmentally sustainable and culturally sensitive housing designs suited to the hot and humid tropics.

The University of Sydney’s Michael Mossman, one of the senior lecturers in the School of Architecture, Design and Planning driving the project, said, “The challenge was facilitating the student immersion and seeing how they would engage with Gunggandji country, the Yarrabah community, and the project brief. The students were overwhelmingly positive and have opened the door for future engagement with the Yarrabah community.”

Vince Schreiber, the King of Yarrabah and a representative of the working party on the Burri Gummin Affordable Housing Project commented on the student concepts: “They really took on some important information about what the land is all about, how we connect to country, and they really integrated it into the planning and the project itself.”

Vi Le, a recent graduate of Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney, was one of four alumni who worked on the project as a student mentor. She believes it was a unique opportunity as “the students had real clients, a real site that they visited and explored, and an actual community they had to respond to, all while tackling complex policy and cultural issues that usually get labelled ‘too difficult’ for a tertiary design project. The greatest challenge was having only two days in Yarrabah to learn from the community and observe the changing weather of a tropical climate.”

Vi Le believes that the students learned how crucial it is to engage with the local community. “Working with specific people with specific needs and expectations made the project very real for the students and gave them a real sense of social justice and responsibility.

Sydney Architecture students learn
Learn more about studying architecture at the University of Sydney

“The architecture profession needs to self-reflect on what it really means to be an architect in an age of climate change, social injustices, in the absence of political will and leadership. We cannot simply rely on drawings of buildings that do not address the wider issues or are illegible to most people outside of our profession,” she said.

Michael Mossman, who has historical connections to Gunggandji country, added, “The experience was special for me, as it provided a chance to work with a community where I have strong historical links and gave me the opportunity to reconnect to place. The community was wonderful in welcoming staff and students onto country and sharing valuable knowledge, which we accepted with great privilege.”

The project is the subject of a new exhibition “Venice | Yarrabah Lines of Enquiry” that officially opened on March 9. It features drawings of the students’ housing concepts and video used to present their design ideas to the Yarrabah community.

The Yarrabah housing project is displayed alongside architectural models exhibited at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale by another group of Master of Architecture students.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Monash Pharmacy offers Australia’s first combined pharmacy degree

The work of pharmacists changes people’s lives for the better. And it has done so for centuries.

Monash Pharmacy offers Australia's first combined pharmacy degree
Study pharmacy at Monash University

But the pharmacy profession is facing a combination of challenges it has never seen before: an ageing global population, increasingly complex and personalised medicines, as well as a move towards team-based integrated healthcare.

With those challenges comes the need for new thinking—from the next generation of practitioners and from those who teach them.

In response to these challenges, Monash University is preparing the students of today for tomorrow’s world of medicine, demography and healthcare by offering a new combined degree. From 2017, Monash Pharmacy will replace the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) with the new Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) / Master of Pharmacy combined degree, Australia’s first integrated BPharm (Hons)/ MPharm degree, with the fifth year of the course offering an internship, so students will get valuable work experience—and get paid for it!

Did you know Monash Pharmacy is ranked #2 in the world according to QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017?

 

Program: Bachelor of Pharmacy / Master of Pharmacy
Location: Parkville campus, Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline, applicants are strongly encouraged by to submit their applications as early as possible.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Australian medical school rankings 2017

Why do so many Canadians consider studying at an Australian medical school?

Austrlian medical school rankings 2017
Find out how you can study medicine in Australia (Photo: Griffith University)

Because Australian and Canada share similar medical systems, similar medical education, and similar medical issues.

Medical schools in Australia offer high-quality education and clinical training in an amazing setting. Studying medicine in Australia is a great experience and really helps students appreciate the worldwide aspect of health, since many clinical placements are offered around the globe.

Another great reason to study in Australia is because of their high world rankings! The QS World University Rankings has recently released its 2017 rankings by subject, and here are the basics regarding how our Australian medical schools stacked up:

World Medical School Rankings 2017

Australian Medical Schools
Canadian Medical Schools
15th University of Sydney
11th University of Toronto
19th University of Melbourne
22nd McGill University
29th Monash University
27th University of British Columbia
42nd University of Queensland
35th McMaster University
(4 OzTREKK Australian Medical Schools in top 50)
(4 Canadian Medical Schools in top 50)

QS World University Rankings by Subject: Medicine, 2017

 

Undergraduate- versus Graduate-entry Medical Programs


Undergraduate Entry: Rather than having to earn a bachelor degree first, undergraduate-entry medical programs allow students to enter directly from high school. If you have completed high school studies or would like to apply to a medical school in Australia without using your MCAT score, you may wish to learn more about undergraduate-entry medical programs offered by Australian universities.
  • JCU Medical School – Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
  • Monash Medical School – Bachelor of Medical Science / Doctor of Medicine (undergraduate entry)

Graduate Entry: Some Australian Medical Schools offer a graduate-entry medical program where you first have to complete an undergraduate degree, such as a Bachelor of Science, in order to apply to a four-year medical program.
The following Australian medical schools offer a medical program at a graduate-entry level, which are similar to those medical programs offered in Canada and the United States:
  • Griffith Medical School – Doctor of Medicine
  • Monash Medical School – Bachelor of Medical Science / Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
  • Melbourne Medical School – Doctor of Medicine
  • UQ Medical School – Doctor of Medicine
  • Sydney Medical School – Doctor of Medicine

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

UQ physiotherapy aims to improve mobility of multiple sclerosis sufferers

An international team of researchers is trialing specially designed shoe insoles aimed at improving the mobility of people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

The study, led by UQ School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences physiotherapy lecturer Dr Anna Hatton, is seeking 176 people affected by MS to take part in a three month trial of the insoles.

UQ physiotherapy aims to improve mobility of multiple sclerosis sufferers
Study physiotherapy at the UQ SHRS!






“Many people with MS experience problems with walking which can make day-to-day activities difficult and often leads to falls, so improving walking ability is of primary importance in maintaining health, independence, and quality of life,” Dr Hatton said.

“Evidence suggests that wearing textured shoe insoles, which are designed to stimulate receptors on the soles of the feet, may be one possible option to help improve gait.

“We now need people with MS to help us investigate whether the novel insoles influence the way the leg and trunk muscles work while walking on both even and uneven surfaces.”

The study will also look for changes in the perception of foot sensation and the awareness of foot position.

“Foot sensation plays an important role in keeping the body upright and balanced when walking, yet we know from previous studies that people with MS often have poor sensation on the soles of their feet,” Dr Hatton said.

“Therefore, wearing a specially designed shoe insole, which enhances sensory information at the feet, could help people affected by MS to walk better."

Dr Hatton’s international research team includes UQ’s Professor Sandra Brauer and Ms Katrina Williams, Professor Graham Kerr of the Queensland University of Technology, Professor Keith Rome of the Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, and Dr John Dixon of Teesside University, UK.

The trial is supported through funding from Multiple Sclerosis Research Australia.
“It is hoped that the study leads to the development of a new treatment technique, specifically an inexpensive, easy-to-administer shoe insole, which could assist mobility and independent living,” Dr Hatton said.

About the University of Queensland Physiotherapy program

The University of Queensland offers a learning environment and has assessment requirements designed to facilitate the advanced and intensive learning appropriate for a master’s-level program. The Master of Physiotherapy Studies introduces graduates to the profession of physiotherapy and its key concepts in intensive mode during an initial summer semester. It focuses on developing core knowledge and skills in the areas of musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiorespiratory and physical therapy across the lifespan, and integrates this knowledge and skill and application of clinical reasoning in supervised clinical practice.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy Studies
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Semester intake: November
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: UQ has a general application deadline of May 30 each year; however, candidates are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Bond Law mooting team competes in state and national pre-moots

The 2017 Bond University Vis (East) Moot team competed in the Queensland round of the CIArb Australia Vis Pre-Moot in Brisbane on 16 February 2017, and as winners of that round progressed to the national round of the CIArb Australia Vis Pre-Moot in Melbourne held on March 1, 2017.

Bond Law mooting team competes in state and national pre-moots
The 2016–2017 Bond University team (Photo credit: Bond University)

Although Australian pre-moots have been held for a number of years, it is the first time that the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators have become involved in the pre-moot competition. It is also the first time that Bond University participated. Pre-moots are an important part of the Vis moot competition, and pre-moots are held all over the world.

The Vis moot competition is the second largest moot competition in the world, and has two ‘sister’ moots—the Willem C Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition held in Vienna, and the Willem C Vis (East) International Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition held in Hong Kong. In 2016, more than 350 teams from all over the world participated in the Vienna moot, and 115 in the Hong Kong moot. The Vis (East) moot is now in its 14th year, and the Vis Vienna moot in its 24th year.

Bond University has participated in the Willem C Vis (East) International Commercial Arbitration Moot Competition since 2009, and has won three of the major awards in the competition since 2011. In 2011, the Bond team won the David Hunter Award for the Team that prevails in Oral Arguments. In 2012 the Bond team won the Eric Bergsten Award for the Best Claimant Memorandum, and in 2015, Lachlan Hopwood, a Bond team member won the Neil Kaplan Award for Best Oralist.

The moot problems set for this competition always deal with matters relating to international commercial dispute resolution through arbitration, and they always involve the application of the UN Convention on the International Sale of Goods. The issues in the problem this year are very interesting, and include the question as to whether an order for security for costs should be granted against the party bringing the matter to arbitration. Another issue is whether a vaguely worded hand-written addendum to an agreement can have the effect of including a fixed exchange rate clause into the original agreement where there was no express regulation of the exchange rate in the original agreement.

The 2016-2017 Bond University team is a diverse team with two Canadian Juris Doctor students, Moira McAvoy and Blake Thomas, and two Australian LLB-combined degree students, Stephanie Centorame and Makaela Fehlhaber. They are coached by the Director of Mooting, Assistant Professor Louise Parsons. The student coach, Jeremy Butcher, was the runner-up in the Neil Kaplan Award for the Best Oralist in the Vis (East) moot in 2016.

The team will head off to Hong Kong at the end of March 2017 where they will compete against 125 other teams from all over the world.

About Mooting
Mooting is a simulated court proceeding where student teams are presented with a legal problem which they are required to argue before a “judge” or panel of “judges.” Through their preparation and presentation of each case, students show an understanding of the relevant law and how it should be applied in their client’s case.

Program: Juris Doctor (JD)
Semester intakes: January, May, or September
Next intake: May 2017
Duration: 2 years (over 6 semesters)
Application deadline: There is no official application deadline. Students from Canada should apply at least three months prior to the beginning of the program.

Entry Requirements
  • Applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in any discipline. Students who have not yet completed a bachelor degree may apply, as long as they will have graduated prior to commencing the Bond JD program. In common with most other Australian universities, Bond does not use the LSAT as an entry criterion.
  • Two reference letters are required.
  • Applicants who have a cumulative average of 70% or above should apply.

Thursday, March 09, 2017

JCU researchers say rural children’s oral health in question

James Cook University researchers say children in rural Queensland are three times more likely to be admitted to hospital for dental problems than in other parts of the state.

The team from JCU’s Anton Breinl Research Centre for Health Systems Strengthening, funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, looked at three rural communities within 400 kilometres of Townsville. The names of the towns have not been publicly released.

JCU researchers say rural children's oral health in question
Dr Karen Carlisle (Photo: JCU)
Dr Karen Carlisle said although these communities were better served than those in more remote locations, access to services was still an issue for many community members.

“Children under 14 were three times more likely to be hospitalised for dental conditions when compared to residents of the rest of Queensland,” she said.

Dr Carlisle said JCU researchers had been working in the communities for a number of years and suspected overall oral health was poor, but now they had the hard data to back this up.

She said they had some unexpected results, too.

“Indigenous persons living in Queensland as a whole are already more than three times as likely to be hospitalised for a dental condition than non-Indigenous people,” said Dr Carlisle. “But this pattern worsened only slightly in the particular rural communities we looked at.”

The researchers said that parents or caregivers play a crucial role in influencing children’s oral health and rural children under 14 years may not be accessing public oral health services in proportion to their need. They said strengthening health promotion though schools, community events and primary health care is vital.

Co-author Professor Sarah Larkins said there were a number of recognised reasons for the poor oral health of rural communities and that the social determinants of health play a major role.

“There are problems with the retention of the oral health workforce in rural areas and reduced availability of oral health services. There may be less access to fluoridated water and the social determinants of ill health, such as poverty and low levels of education, are all more prevalent in rural and remote areas.”

She said the stoicism of rural people and difficulties in accessing care tended to encourage them to tolerate oral health problems until they became acute.

Professor Larkins said the findings highlight the vital importance of a collaborative approach to planning and service delivery to improve oral health for rural communities.

“JCU partners with communities in research to try to make services work better for people living and working in the bush. This extends to frontline engagement too.

“The university sends its health professional students, including dentistry students, to remote and rural regions on placements, to do outreach in schools and encourages its graduates to return back to rural and remote areas to work after graduation,” said Professor Larkins.

Dr Felicity Croker said the communities JCU has focused on have been very receptive to working with students and academics.

“They have really taken charge of improving the oral health in their community, particularly for the younger members of their community.  Engaging these communities in changing the direction of their own health care means that the changes are more likely to be appropriate and sustainable.”
By Prof Larkins

JCU Bachelor of Dental Surgery

The BDS program at JCU is a five-year undergraduate degree that provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes they need to become competent practitioners of dentistry. It is a broad-based program which includes all aspects of dental practice but also has a special focus on issues of special concern to the northern Australian region, particularly those relating to tropical, rural and Indigenous practice.

Program: Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS)
Location: Cairns, Queensland
Semester intake: February
Duration: 5 years
Application deadline: August 30, 2017

Entry requirements
1. High School
These qualifications are considered on an individual basis, subject to satisfying prerequisite requirements.
  • A minimum of 92% average from grade 12 subjects.
  • Completion of prerequisites in English, Calculus, and Chemistry at a grade 12 level or higher.
2. Partially or fully completed undergraduate degree
A high level of academic standard is required for entry.
  • Students need to have met the prerequisite subjects at least at the high school level to meet the prerequisite requirements.
  • A minimum of 80% cumulative average across all university studies is required.
Please note the DAT is not required for entry into the Bachelor of Dental Surgery program.

Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?

Are you considering applying to Australian Medical Schools? Then you’ll probably want to write the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is administered multiple times from late January through early September, and offered at hundreds of test sites in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

Applying to Australian medical schools: when do you need to sit the MCAT?
Don’t forget to study! (Photo: Monash University)

The following graduate-entry medical programs require applicants to sit a medical admission test such as the MCAT:
  • Griffith University – Doctor of Medicine
  • University of Melbourne – Doctor of Medicine
  • UQ – Doctor of Medicine
  • Sydney – Doctor of Medicine
Keep the score release dates in mind when you are registering, as you will need to have your MCAT score at the time of application.

All deadlines are at 11:59 PM ET on the day of the deadline.

Test date Score release date
March 31 May 2
April 22 May 23
April 28 May 30
May 13 June 13
May 18 June 20
May 19 June 20
June 1 July 6
June 16 July 18
June 17 July 18
June 29 Aug. 1
June 30 Aug. 1
July 21 Aug. 22
July 22 Aug. 22
July 27 Aug. 29
July 28 Aug. 29
August 3 Sept. 5
August 4 Sept. 5
August 11 Sept. 12
August 18 Sept. 19
August 19 Sept. 19
August 24 Sept. 26
August 25 Sept. 26

The first three sections organized around 10 foundational concepts in the sciences (biology, biochemistry, organic chemistry, general chemistry, physics, psychology, sociology). In the Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section, students are asked to analyze, evaluate, and apply information provided by passages from a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines.
  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills
Register to write the MCAT: https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/taking-mcat-exam/

If you are in high school, you can still apply to an Australian medical school—and you don’t need to sit the MCAT! The following Australian medical schools offer medical programs that international students may enter directly from high school:
  • Griffith University – Bachelor of Medical Science/Doctor of Medicine
  • James Cook University – Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery
  • Monash University – Bachelor of Medical Science / Doctor of Medicine

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?

Are you interested in health sciences? You’ve got a wonderful selection of study areas to choose from: physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology…. But have you considered exercise and sports science?



Sydney Health Sciences is known for world-leading health sciences education and research. The discipline of exercise and sport science focuses on the integration of exercise and physical activity into health care, sports performance, disease prevention and rehabilitation.

Graduates have the opportunity to utilise principles such as biomechanics, musculoskeletal rehabilitation and gait analysis to evaluate and improve the performance of a diverse range of athletes.

Sydney Health Sciences asks, which sport and fitness course is right for you?
Dr Ollie Jay is the Director of the Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in Thermoregulatory Physiology at the Faculty of Health Sciences. (Photo: University of Sydney)
The career paths followed by graduates are many and varied and depend mostly on the specific interests and aspirations of the individual. Broadly defined, the areas of employment entered by recent graduates include the sport industry, fitness industry, health industry, occupational health and safety, public health, rehabilitation, research and technology, education and medical insurance.

University of Sydney Master of Exercise Physiology

The Master of Exercise Physiology is designed to produce graduates who possess the knowledge, competencies and clinical experience required for safe and effective clinical exercise practice.

Students will explore metabolism and physiology, human motor learning and control, the principles of exercise programming, nutrition, and musculoskeletal principles of exercise. Integrated clinical practice instruction, practicums, and case studies will provide the advanced skills and experience essential for professional practice.

Clinical placements are undertaken in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the career path they have chosen, and its place in the contemporary health system.

Program: Master of Exercise Physiology
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: March
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: TBA


Tuesday, March 07, 2017

The University of Melbourne would like to meet you at their virtual fair!

Are you wondering what it’s like to study at the prestigious University of Melbourne?

The University of Melbourne would like to meet you at their virtual fair!
Don’t miss the Melbourne virtual fair for international students March 22

Prospective international students and their parents are invited to join the university for an exciting online event to learn more about the University of Melbourne and their programs. If you haven’t applied to the university yet, and are just starting to consider your study options, this “virtual fair” is for you!

Event Details

University of Melbourne Virtual Fair for International Students

Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Time: 6 – 9 p.m. (EDT)
Register: http://tiny.cc/melb_virtual_fair_2017

Chat with staff from Melbourne’s faculties and graduate schools to explore your study options and find out what makes the university consistently ranked one of the top 35 universities in the world (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2015-2016), located in the world’s most livable city (The Economist 2016). You’ll have the chance to chat online with Melbourne’s friendly staff and students and find out all you need to know about degrees available, entry requirements, scholarships available, and much more!

Monday, March 06, 2017

Features of the University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine

As Australia’s first dental school, the Sydney Dental School has been training dental practitioners for more than 100 years.

Sydney graduates are caring, clear thinking, clinically outstanding and research capable. They are engaged and globally aware and have the capability to become leaders in oral health, dentistry and research.

Features of the University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine
Learn more about Sydney Dental School
The Doctor of Dental Medicine is based on a full recognition of the greater level of academic maturity and higher level analytical, clinical and communication skills of postgraduate students. This allows for higher order learning with a greater emphasis on independent, self-directed learning. Consequently it is expected that students will achieve quantitatively and qualitatively greater clinical (i.e., patient-based) experience.
Important features of the DMD include
  • focusing on the relevance of medical sciences to oral health and to dental practice;
  • earlier patient-based clinical experience and increased clinical experience to be obtained in clinics in metropolitan, rural and remote areas;
  • science-based prerequisite coursework;
  • utilising contemporary teaching and learning methods aligned to a course at a master’s degree level, with emphasis on electronic resources and learner–centred studies to provide the foundation material/knowledge, supported by tutorials to facilitate understanding and reflection
  • development of graduates who consistently display higher-order cognitive skills to synthesise, integrate and translate research and knowledge to communication and clinical skills, and practice dentistry at the highest professional and ethical level;
  • a defined research component as foundation to an evidence-based approach to professional practice, clearly distinguishing the education from a skills-based approach. Furthermore, this will prepare students for higher degree research studies and possible careers in research and/or academia;
  • the development of leadership skills which distinguish the Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine graduates and their contribution to the dental profession, academia and public health services;
  • exposure, either in person or through mentoring, to international oral health activities.

University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine

The University of Sydney Doctor of Dental Medicine is an extremely popular program! It is recommended that candidates submit their applications as early as possible.

Program: Doctor of Dental Medicine
Location: Sydney, New South Wales
Semester intake: February
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: TBA. For the 2017 intake, applications closed June 21, 2016.

Friday, March 03, 2017

5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University

Here’s a James Cook University Student Blog about studying marine biology, and why JCU is such a fantastic choice!

Before I came to university, I had a hard time deciding which university to choose. Making a list and weighing all the advantages and disadvantages helped me to make my decision and I surely do not regret it now. Coming to JCU was the best decision I made. Here is a small list of why I think JCU is the best place in the world to study marine biology.

5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University
JCU marine biology student Kessia Virah-Sawmy (Photo: JCU Connect)

1. So close to the iconic Great Barrier Reef

I come from an island found in the tropics and my country is surrounded by fringing reefs. I wanted to study somewhere where I could learn about corals and reef fishes and where best to do it than right on the Great Barrier Reef, the largest reef on the planet and a world heritage. The location of the GBR was the main reason why I chose JCU. With the reef right at their doorstep, researchers and students at JCU can work very closely on coral reefs.

Being in the tropics also means that Townsville has hot summers and nice (not-so-cold) winters. It is like summer all year round which is very similar to my tropical home. It was thus not a problem for me to adapt to this new environment.

2. Best facilities and lecturers

Studying marine biology at JCU means that you have access to a wide number of facilities from live specimens in practical classes to research facilities in both marine biology and aquaculture. JCU has a marine research station on Orpheus island which is located just off the coast of Ingham, about 2 hours North of Townsville. With accommodation and research facilities on the island, students can go on the island for specific classes to study the incredible marine life that surrounds the island.

James Cook University is highly recognised in terms of research done in the marine field including coral reef research, shark research or fisheries work. For the past years that I have been at JCU, I have had the great privilege of having lecturers who are experts in their field and who are eager and passionate to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. It is always great to hear about their experience and how they became who they are today. It gives us a sense of pride when we read a paper written by one of our lecturers or seeing them on the news. The JCU lecturers are world-known scientists who work with different research bodies such as the ARC (Australian Research Council) Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies or the Australian Institute of Marine Science.

5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University
Diving is a given at JCU (Photo: JCU Connect)

3. Incredible field trips

As soon as I started first year, the lecturers were already getting us excited about field trips. Field trips are by far the most exciting part about studying marine biology. From going up Castle hill to look at rocks, to going down to the strand to count snails, or visiting fish farms, to snorkelling for hours around Orpheus island, I have been able to go on some incredible field trips so far.

Field trips makes the course even more interesting. You look forward to this one weekend where you get to spend 2 days on an island surrounded by the most beautiful coral reefs where you snorkel for hours and hours without getting tired of it. Or you get excited when you get to discover the breathtaking North Queensland while visiting fish farms. There are quite a few classes that have field trips to Orpheus island such as MB3160- Evolution and Ecology of Reef fishes, MB3190- Coral Reef Ecology, MB3210- Life History and Evolution of Reef Corals, MB3300- Coral Reef Ecosystems and EV3406- Coral Reef Geomorphology. I also enjoyed the AQ2002- Introduction to Tropical Aquaculture class where we got to visit different aquaculture farms in North Queensland.

4. Diving opportunities

The Great Barrier Reef offers amazing diving opportunities. From shallow reef diving off Cairns to the world-known shipwreck dive of Yongala, there is lots to see and discover. I had the chance to do get my Advanced PADI open water course on a liveaboard on the GBR. It was the best experience ever! We were able to dive with sharks, turtles and rays and see some amazing corals.

5 reasons to study marine biology at James Cook University
The iconic Great Barrier Reef (Photo: JCU Connect)

The JCU Dive Club also offers a number of trips throughout the semester ranging from day trips to 10-day trips on the reef. It is one of the most famous and active clubs on campus. They also offer courses such as Open divers, Advanced Divers, Rescue divers or CPR and First Aid courses.

5. Meeting people from all over the world

JCU is well known for marine studies and therefore attracts students from all over the world. I am not lying when I say that most of my classmates are international students. From Asia, to Europe, to the USA, to Africa, I have met people from all over the place. It is great to see how multicultural the campus is. As an international, this provides a welcoming environment where you learn to accept each other’s culture. I have developed close and strong friendships with different people and I can’t wait to travel the world and visit all of them.

I have also met some amazing Australian people who are always so eager to make us discover their culture which is mainly Barbies and a “cool” attitude. They are by far the most welcoming people I have ever met. A few months in the country and the Aussies will have already taught you how to speak Australian, which is basically just shortening every word.

There are so many more reasons to why I chose JCU but those are my top 5. JCU is recognised worldwide as one of the best in marine research, more specifically in Coral Reef research and Tropical Aquaculture. Many of my friends back home were sceptic as to why I would come all the way to far North Queensland to study Marine Biology. Well now I can tell them that it is the best decision I have made and I would not have chosen a different university.
Story by Kessia Virah-Sawmy via JCU Connect

Master of Science in Marine Biology and Ecology

JCU is the leading education and research institution for Marine Biology in the Tropics. JCU’s unique location enables students from Australia and overseas to study in a diverse physical environment unparalleled by any university in the world.

The postgraduate degree program in Marine Biology and Ecology is internationally recognised. We focus on developing career professionals who can address the grand challenges for marine and coastal ecosystems, particularly in the tropical Asia-Pacific region. You will be researching and tackling issues such as
  • Climate change, ecosystem resilience and adaptation
  • Ecosystem restoration
  • Environmental and ecological sustainability
  • Biodiversity and conservation challenges for marine organisms and ecosystems
  • Sustainable marine resource management
  • Global and regional food security
  • Sustainable livelihoods for coastal and island based societies.
Program: Master of Science (Marine Biology and Ecology)
Location: Townsville, Queensland
Duration: 1.5 years
Semester intakes: February and July
Application deadline: January 30 and June 29 each year
Entry requirements: Completion of a recognised, appropriate undergraduate degree attaining a minimum of 65% or equivalent prior learning including appropriate professional experience.

What are University of Sydney physiotherapy placements like?

University of Sydney Physiotherapy Placements

The physiotherapy placement program allows Sydney physiotherapy students the opportunity to apply and develop their skills with “real life” clients. The placements can be undertaken in a hospital, private or community setting in Sydney or regional/rural NSW.

Placements are in a variety of areas. Some of these areas may include rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory/outpatients, aged care, community health, paediatrics, orthopaedics and hand therapy. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. These skills are assessed using the Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice (APP) form. During placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. All students are required to undertake at least one placement outside of Sydney or in a rural location.

What are University of Sydney physiotherapy placements like?
Learn more about the Sydney physiotherapy program (Image: University of Sydney)

How are placements arranged?

Placements are arranged by negotiation between staff of the respective academic unit, acting as Clinical Educator Coordinators, and the staff of the individual placement setting. The academic unit negotiates the standard, type of experience, and number of student places to be offered. In most cases, formal agreements are signed between the university  and the placement facility.

What are the conditions of placements?

There are a number of rules and conditions applying to students regarding the amount of workplace based education, its timing, the selection of sites, and types of experiences required. These rules have implications for progression in the course and acceptance into the relevant profession after graduation.

How are students assessed?

Sydney physiotherapy are expected to take an active responsibility for their own education by identifying their own learning needs, assisting the placement supervisor in planning and implementing the learning experiences, being familiar with and adhering to procedures and rules laid down by the university and the affiliating centre, and in evaluating their own performance.

The placement supervisor performs the role of teacher, facilitator, coordinator and professional role model. Supervision may be conducted by staff of the respective academic unit for the on campus clinics, or by external practitioners at external sites, who are expert in their professional area.

The nature of the assessment varies across academic units but generally includes a student evaluation by both the supervisor and the student, the satisfactory completion of the learning objectives, as well as a variety of assignments that may include case studies, essays, verbal presentations and practical examinations. The clinical education unit may be assessed on a graded scale or on a pass/fail basis.

University of Sydney’s Master of Physiotherapy

The University of Sydney offers a two year, graduate-entry Master of Physiotherapy program, which is intended for students coming from an undergraduate degree in a related field and who wish to gain the requirements to become a physiotherapist. Coursework throughout this program builds on the major areas of the profession, such as musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurological physiotherapy, as well as looking at the profession in its societal context.

Program: Master of Physiotherapy
Location: Lidcombe, (suburb of Sydney), New South Wales
Duration: 2 years
Semester intake: March each year
Application deadline: Applications are usually assessed on a rolling basis (as they are received). The sooner you apply the better.

Entry Requirements
To be eligible to apply, you must have the following:

1. Completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized university.

2. Have achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 4.5, which the University of Sydney states is approximately equivalent to a credit average or better. A credit average at the University of Sydney is between a 65–74%. Your grades assessed for admission are based on your highest-ranked university degree.

3. Have completed undergraduate studies in the following prerequisite areas:
  • Human Anatomy
  • Human Physiology
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Psychology

Thursday, March 02, 2017

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke

Melburnians are taking part in a world-first trial led by Monash University that could see a simple one-off vaccination protect against heart attack and stroke.

The trial, which started late last year, aims to determine whether the pneumococcal vaccine can reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke by up to 20 per cent. Observational studies indicate the injection can lead to a 17 per cent protection against cardiovascular disease, but this is the first large scale study to be conducted.

Monash University leads vaccination trial against heart disease and stroke
Professor Andrew Tonkin and Dr Ingrid Hopper (Photo: Monash University)

The Australian Study for the Prevention through Immunisation of Cardiovascular Events (AUSPICE) trial is being coordinated by the Centre for Cardiovascular Research and Education in Therapeutics (CCRET) within the Monash University School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine (SPHPM). The trial is led by Principal Investigator Professor Andrew Tonkin and assisted by Dr Ingrid Hopper and will be based at Caulfield Hospital.

AUSPICE is recruiting up to 3,000 men and women aged 55 to 60 years across six centres in Melbourne, Newcastle, Gosford, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth.

The study will formally test whether the existing pneumococcal vaccine can not only reduce invasive pneumococcal disease but also help to prevent heart attack and stroke. The pneumococcal vaccine protects against diseases such as meningitis and is currently free under the National Immunise Australia Program for people over 65, children and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children.

According to Dr Hopper, if the trial proves to be successful it will signify a major change in preventative health practice globally.

“If shown to be effective, it would be relatively easy to incorporate changes into clinical practice because the pneumococcal vaccine is safe and has already been used in Australia for over 20 years in a different target group,” Dr Hopper said.

Victorian volunteers, aged 60–64, are asked to attend a single clinic at the Caulfield Clinical Trials Centre in Melbourne, for less than one hour. People with at least two risk factors for heart disease—high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or overweight/obesity—will be randomised to receive either the active vaccine or a saline placebo.

This collaboration between Monash University, the University of Newcastle, Australian National University, Flinders University and The University of Western Australia comprises a large multidisciplinary team including cardiologists, epidemiologists, neurologists, nurse immunisers, pharmacists, public health and medicine physicians and biostatisticians.

The researchers will link, via the Federal Department of Health hospital admission records, the incidence of cardiovascular disease requiring hospitalisation among those who received the vaccine and those who received the placebo.

Study Public Health at Monash University

The Master of Public Health at Monash is a 12-unit program provides students with the full range of quantitative, analytical and communication skills necessary to work in the broad domain of public health. It especially focuses on developing skills in the quantitative methods of the population-based health sciences and their problem-solving application for primary care provision both in Australia and for developing countries.

Program: Master of Public Health
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Semester intake: February
Duration: 2 years
Application deadline: While there is no set application deadline for this program, applicants are strongly encouraged by the university to submit their applications a minimum of three months prior to the program’s start date.

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Study Medicine at Monash University

The Bachelor of Medical Science and Doctor of Medicine at Monash University has been designed in close consultation with doctors, health care professionals and leaders in the health and research sectors to give students the scientific background and clinical expertise to ensure that graduates are prepared for their future as a doctor.

Program: Bachelor of Medical Science Doctor of Medicine (graduate entry)
Location: Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria (approx. 2 hours southeast of Melbourne)
Semester intake: February 2018
Duration: 4 years
Application deadline: July 21, 2017


Wednesday, March 01, 2017

University of Sydney offering $10 million in new scholarships for international postgraduate students

International students will have even more reason to choose the University of Sydney for their postgraduate research degrees, with the announcement of 40 new fully funded PhD scholarships available from 2017.

“We want to attract the best students from anywhere in the world and these new scholarships—growing to an investment of $10 million per year—will help us do that,” said Associate Professor Ross Coleman, the university’s Director of Graduate Research.

University of Sydney offering $10 million in new scholarships for international postgraduate students
Find out how you can apply for a Sydney scholarship (Photo: University of Sydney)

“The university was founded on a principle of meritocratic admission and we are pleased to build on this foundation with these new PhD scholarships,” said Associate Professor Coleman.

“Graduate students are future researchers and high-level thinkers who will help solve the problems facing the world, as well as making new knowledge available to everyone. These new scholarships will help more of the cleverest people do their PhD studies with us.”

The new scholarships will be available to all international postgraduate research students in any discipline, and students will be considered for the scholarships when they tick the scholarship option on their application to study. Scholarship winners will be selected on the basis of academic performance in qualifying degrees and any prior research experience.

Like all University of Sydney centrally awarded postgraduate research scholarships, these new scholarships will be available all year with no application closing dates. The best students will get a scholarship offer in less than two months from submitting their application to study.

The new scholarships follow the same allocation as the federal government’s Research Training Program scholarships, which are for both domestic and international postgraduate research students. The university’s new international student scholarships include
  • tuition fees for the postgraduate research degree;
  • a stipend to assist students with their living costs while undertaking their postgraduate research degree; and
  • an allowance to assist students with ancillary costs of their degree, including relocation costs to Sydney, thesis printing and academic publication costs, and overseas student health cover costs.
“The value of a PhD is in the capacity of the doctoral graduate to identify and think through difficult problems. By increasing the number of funded PhD scholarships for students to work with our world-leading researchers, the University of Sydney is investing significantly in a better future,” said Associate Professor Coleman.